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Fried fish, without the greasy feel or taste

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By Joan Martin

Fish is healthy but fried fish is not as good for us as fish that’s prepared without frying.
In fact, nutritionists say that frying fish negates the benefit of eating fish.  
I like a crunchy coating on the fish but I don’t like a greasy feel or taste. The best way to get crunch is to use panko bread crumbs. Corn flakes will work, but they still look like crunched corn flakes to me.
Regular bread crumbs are softer and don’t get as crunchy.
Panko is a type of bread crumb, not a brand name. It’s become more common in America in the last few years.  It originated in Japan.
The bread crumbs are made from a different type of bread that doesn’t have crust. It has a lighter texture and is crisper than typical breadcrumbs.
You will probably find it in the Asian food section of the grocery store.
Any mild flavored fish, fresh or frozen, can be used in this recipe. Adjust the spices to suit your taste.

Panko crusted
tilapia – 2 servings
2  - 4-ounce tilapia filets
2 egg whites, beaten lightly
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon seasoning for fish like Old Bay or dill mixture
1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
Preheat oven to 400 F.
Line baking sheet with aluminum foil and coat with non-stick cooking spray.
Combine lemon juice and seasoning with egg whites.
Dip each fillet into the egg white mixture and dredge in panko.
Bake 10 to 12 minutes for thin fillets. Cook until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.
Sprinkle each fillet with 1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese
Remember that fish cooks at a higher temperature but for a shorter period of time than beef, pork and poultry.
Future free cooking programs include Growing and Cooking with Herbs at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 21 at the Anderson County Extension Office.
A five part Food Preservation Workshop will begin in May.
Dates and cost will be announced soon. Learn how to use a pressure canner and water bath canner.
You will can meat, poultry, fish, vegetables, fruits, tomatoes and tomato products. Make jelly and jam. You will also learn to preserve food by freezing and drying.

Joan Martin is a family and consumer science agent at the Anderson County Extension.