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Officials urge vaccination following state’s first reported cases of influenza

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By The Staff

News that the state’s first positive cases for influenza this week has prompted local health officials to remind residents that flu shots are now available at the Anderson County Health Department, located on Glensboro Road in Lawrenceburg.
“We still have vaccine,” said Tim Wright, the agency’s director of public health. “We are giving shots every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.”
The Kentucky Department of Public Health announced that two cases of flu have been identified in Henderson and Jefferson counties, according to a news release.
Kentucky’s flu activity will be classified as “sporadic,” the lowest level indicating flu activity, according to the news release.
Flu season typically begins in October or November. Kentuckians are encouraged to get a flu vaccine as soon as their health provider has it in stock, because it takes about two weeks for immunity to develop and offer protection against flu. However, vaccination can be given any time during the flu season, according to the news release.
Local health departments and private health care providers are expected to have adequate supplies of flu vaccine on hand for this year’s season, and many providers already have some supplies of vaccine. Additional vaccine shipments should be arriving over the next few weeks. Kentuckians should contact their health care provider or local health department for more information about influenza vaccination.
“Getting the flu can be debilitating and sometimes life-threatening, and vaccination is the best tool we have to prevent illness,” said Stephanie Mayfield, M.D., commissioner of DPH. “Kentuckians can also reduce the risk for influenza by following a few simple steps. You should follow the advice your mother gave you to prevent flu and other illnesses that tend to circulate at this time of year – wash your hands frequently, cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze, and stay home when you’re sick.”