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The Way We Were

  • Way We Were: Hays correspondent for Co-Ed magazine

    50 YEARS AGO
    Dec. 6, 1962
    Patricia Hays, 16, was named a correspondent for the 1962-63 school year for Co-Ed Magazine.
    Hays, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rual Hays of Sinai, was a junior at Western High School. Her home economics teacher made the appointment.
    Selected for her qualities of leadership and enthusiasm for home economics, Hays was to serve as a junior advisor to the editors of Co-Ed, a national magazine for teenage girls, and to keep them informed about the activities at Western High School.

  • Way We Were: Intruder consumed soda pop, sandwich

    50 YEARS AGO
    Nov. 29, 1962
    Charles Whitt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Whitt, fell at a skating party last week and suffered an injury to his right knee.

    Mr. and Mrs. R.C. Crouch Jr. were pictured on the front page checking on the tobacco that had been collected and stored at the Western Community barns in the 4-H tobacco drive in progress. There were 15 sticks donated so far in the Western area for the drive. Crouch was the chairman of the collection drive.

  • Way We Were: Free fruitcake with tire purchase at Twin Oaks

    50 YEARS AGO
    Nov. 22, 1962
    James B. Young was appointed jailer of Anderson County by County Judge W.S. Johnson to fill the vacancy left by the death of Charles W. Young on Nov. 15.
    The new jailer, son of the late Mr. Young, held a position with IBM in Lexington. During his father’s illness, he and his family moved to the jailer’s residence to assist in the operation of the jail and care of the courthouse.

  • Way We Were: Juanita Sutherland in Who's Who

    50 YEARS AGO
    Nov. 15, 1962
    Juanita Sutherland, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Sutherland of Route 1, Gee, was chosen to Who’s Who in American Universities and Colleges. A senior at Georgetown College, she was awarded the honor on the basis of excellence and sincerity in scholarship, leadership and participation in extracurricular and academic activities, along with citizenship and service to the school and promise of future usefulness to business and society.

  • Way Were Were: Michele Thomas crowned queen at KSU

    50 YEARS AGO
    Nov. 1, 1962
    A&P had a canned goods sale. Iona hominy, corn, green beans; Sultana pork & beans and corn, and A&P pumpkin were 10 cents a can. Sultana fruit cocktail was 79 cents for four cans; Red sour cherries were 69 cents for four cans and you could get four cans of A&P applesauce for 55 cents.

    Ballard’s Rexall Drug Store advertised a 1-cent sale — 2 for 1 plus a penny to celebrate their golden anniversary.

  • Way We Were: Sue, Pete, Jimmy and Kate put on the dog

    50 YEARS AGO
    Nov. 1, 1962
    Building permits were issued to F.L. Barnes for a storage building at an estimated cost of $275; Mrs. Bertha Medley, new construction of additional room and porch for dwelling of building on South Gatewood at a cost of $400; Mrs. John Coubert, Ballard Street, new construction of additional room for bath at cost of $400.

    Ann Spencer was one of 11 co-eds at Eastern Kentucky State College chosen as ROTC sponsors by the 1,100 members of the Corps. Spencer was to be the sponsor for company “C.”

  • Way We Were: Local FFA chapter wins superior award

    50 YEARS AGO
    Oct. 25, 1962
    The Anderson Future Farmers of America chapter received the National Superior Chapter Award for the year 1962.
    The National Chapter Awards Program is designed to give recognition to local FFA chapters in accomplishing outstanding programs of activities and in providing valuable educational experiences for the entire membership.
    The awards are based upon the degree of achievement of local chapters in meeting approved standards and in carrying out an outstanding program of work.

  • Way We Were: More entries from blacksmith’s ledger

    Compiled by Janie Bowen
    J.D. Milton ran a blacksmith shop in Avenstoke in the early 1900s.
    After his wife died, he raised two boys and a girl.
    One of his sons, Millard Milton, became the postmaster at Avenstoke. The train that traveled through would pick up the mailbag from a hook on a post near the tracks, just like you see in the old westerns.
    J.D. Milton’s grandson and Millard’s son, Curtis Milton, was raised in Avenstoke. He brought in an old ledger a while back that came from his grandfather’s blacksmith shop.

  • Way We Were: Avenstoke blacksmith important to area

    Compiled by Janie Bowen
    J.D. Milton ran a blacksmith shop in Avenstoke in the early 1900s.
    After his wife died, he raised two boys and a girl.
    One of his sons, Millard Milton, became the postmaster at Avenstoke. The train that traveled through would pick up the mailbag from a hook on a post near the tracks, just like you see in the old westerns.
    J.D. Milton’s grandson, Millard’s son, Curtis Milton, was raised in Avenstoke. He brought in an old ledger a while back that came from his grandfather’s blacksmith shop.

  • Way We Were: Missing heifer found in sunken ground

    50 YEARS AGO
    Oct. 4, 1962
    Installation of new officers of the Broken Arrow Archery Club was held at a dinner meeting at Mrs. Allen’s Tea Room. Winners of the recent championship shoot were also announced.
    Shoot winners were: free style — Bill Sayre, Mrs. Bill Sayre; instinctive — women’s division, Mrs. Wilda Bond; men’s division, Jesse Duncan; junior boys — Larry Sayre; cubs — Kathy Sayre.