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Education

  • Student named to UK honor society

    Braden Kyle Peyton, son of Brian and Holly Peyton of Lawrenceburg, recently became a member of Phi Sigma Theta National Honor Society at the University of Kentucky, according to a news release.
    Phi Sigma Theta is a national honor society dedicated to recognizing and rewarding academic achievement in undergraduates at intuitions of higher learning, according to a news release.
     

  • Academy students receive awards from Conservation District

    The Anderson County Soil Conservation District recently announced its annual award winners at the Extension Office.  
    Robert Bird was selected as the second place overall winner in the county as a participant in the essay contest. Julia Fuqua was the first place overall county winner in the poster contest.
    Forest Bowman and Rachel Baker were school winners of the contest. Also winning at the school level for the Christian Academy were Cloey Henson, Taylor Nevins and Isabella Hellard.    

  • Turner’s gone reading ‘mad’

    During the month of March, Turner Elementary held a “reading madness” contest for students and staff, according to a news release.
    Everyone read books and completed summary forms to be entered for a drawing for prizes. All participants received two free tickets to a Lexington Legends Game compliments of their “Hit the Books” program.  
    Grand prize winners received a Kindle for kindergarten and first grade, and three Kindle Fires for second, third and fourth/fifth grades.

  • Bus driver honored as KEA Education Support Professional of the Year

    Richard Davenport, a school bus driver for the Anderson County school district, was recently awarded the Education Support Professional of the Year award through the Kentucky Education Association, according to a press release.
    “Each year, one Education Support Professional receives the KEA ESP of the Year Award in recognition of their outstanding contribution to their schools, communities and profession,” the release said.  
    To date there have been 20 recipients of the national award, with the first ESP of the Year award being presented in 1992.

  • Early Childhood students raise $200 for Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation

    At the Ezra Sparrow Family Fun Night April 25, several kindergarteners helped create a lemonade stand to raise money for the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, according to special education teacher Saralyn Kingsolver. “They took up donations for lemonade and cookies and made over $200 for Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation,” Kingsolver said via e-mail.

  • ACE, Apple Corps honor volunteers at appreciation lunch

    Anderson Community Education and the Apple Corps Volunteer Program hosted a volunteer appreciation luncheon April 23 for volunteers in the community and Anderson County Schools, according to a news release.
    Amanda Maude, volunteer coordinator for ACE, welcomed the volunteers and special guests to a great day of celebration, event organizers said.
    “The lunch was held at the Anderson County Senior Citizen Center and the center was decorated beautifully in a colorful, spring theme,” according to the news release.

  • Education briefs: 4-24-13

    Lawrenceburg student receives $1,000 scholarship
    from Kentucky law enforcement memorial foundation
    Harrison Mark-Shane Evans of Lawrenceburg was recently awarded the Gerald F. Healy Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation Scholarship, according to a press release.
    Evans, a student at the University of Kentucky, was one of 25 recipients of the $1,000 scholarship. Evans is the son of Lexington Division of Police Detective Lora Harrison.

  • Raman freed after 30 years of paying his family debt

    Although many people consider slavery to be an event of the past, slavery still exist in many countries, as well as the United States. Modern day slavery can effect by debt bondage and forced labor. Many researchers told and showed that 27 million people work as slaves in the world. This number is higher than the number of slaves that were in slavery in the past. There are several examples from text and videos that show the world this horrible problem.

  • More people enslaved today than ever before

    Most people think that slavery only happened long ago, but actually there are more people enslaved today then there ever have been. Even though it’s illegal everywhere, there is an estimate of 27,000,000 slaves worldwide. Slavery types are debt bondage and forced labor. Even when slavery was legal in the U.S., there weren’t as many slaves as there are today. An example from a text shows that slavery is still around.

  • Learn about Rajesh, help stop slavery

    Although most people consider slavery non-existent, slavery does exist in many different countries, including the U.S. Research on slavery shows that an estimate of 27 million people are enslaved. That number is more than the number of slaves that were enslaved when slavery was legal back in the 1800s.  Several examples from videos, texts, and even a survey shows the world what slavery is like.