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Local News

  • Hume elected to international position

    Robbie Hume says he’s honored to achieve what only two other city clerks in Kentucky have done before, but he’s more interested in what being elected to an international post will do for the people he serves.

    Hume, who serves as clerk and administrator for the City of Lawrenceburg, was recently elected to the board of directors for the International Institute of Municipal Clerks (IIMC), becoming just the third clerk from a Kentucky city to hold the position.

  • 'An addict's life'

    Fresh out of his latest stint in rehab, admitted drug addict Matt Hayes overdosed and was moments from death as he laid helplessly on a friend’s bathroom floor.
    “I just thought I could celebrate one time,” Hayes said.
    His body no longer used to the drugs that were ruining his once-promising life, Hayes ended up on life support but lived to tell his tale.

  • Fair carney charged with rape

    Federal marshals swooped into the Lawrenceburg Fair and Horse Show tonight and arrested a carnival worker wanted on a charge of aggravated rape.

    The worker is identified as Sean Halper, 28, of Worcester, Massachusetts, where the alleged rape occurred.

    Agents with the U.S. Marshal Fugitive Task Force, along with Det. Sgt. Bryan Taylor of the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office, made the arrest around 6 p.m. at the fair.

    Taylor is a member of the Eastern District of Kentucky Fugitive Task Force.

  • Passion for rodeo carries teen to high school nationals

    While most teenagers spend the summer lounging around the pool, soon-to-be Anderson County High School senior Avery Reynolds will be traveling across the country with her family to the National High School Finals Rodeo in Gillette, Wyoming.

    Avery earned a spot in the world’s largest rodeo by winning the barrel racing and pole bending competitions at the state level. She was also named Miss Central Kentucky Regional High School Rodeo Queen.

    “Rodeo is what I love,” she explained. “It’s my passion.”

  • Teenagers learn, bond during Fire Cadet Camp

    Finding one teenager willing to spend a week of summer vacation away from home doing hot, sweaty work with no pay might seem impossible.

    Finding eight of them? Forget about it.

    The Anderson County Fire Department did just that, however, when it conducted Fire Cadet Camp last week for eight willing participants eager to learn about life as a real firefighter.

  • Feds seeking comments on Highway 151 truck ban

    The federal government is seeking comments on turning a temporary ban of Surface Area Transportation Act trucks in Highway 151 into a permanent ban.

    Comments will be accepted through July 15 by logging onto www.regulations.gov and going to https://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FHWA-2016-0012-0001.

    Getting a permanent ban would eliminate only the largest tractor-trailers from traveling the dangerous stretch of state highway, which has made headlines in recent months after residents sued Kentucky to prove it is safe enough for large trucks.

  • Horse competitions, pageants highlight rest of fair week

    The 2016 Lawrenceburg Fair and Horse Show continues through Saturday at the American Legion Fairgrounds.

    Cost of admission is $10 per person and includes all shows, carnival rides and attractions.

    The side shows continue each evening. Joey’s Bubble Factory opens the shows each evening at 6:30 p.m. Jurassic Kingdom performs at 7:30 p.m. Beast Riders Motorcycle Globe Show begins at 8:30 p.m., followed by Zega the Robot at 9:30 p.m.

  • Autopsy: Dog starved to death

    The Ripy Street man facing a misdemeanor animal cruelty charge for tying up his dog and allowing it to starve cannot be be charged with a felony, according to County Attorney Bobbi Jo Lewis, who is prosecuting the case.

    During a hearing last Thursday in Anderson District Court that included Howard D. Tinnell, 39, of 308 Ripy St., entering a plea of not guilty, Lewis revealed that although an autopsy of the dog shows that it starved to death, that does not rise to the level of torture, which is required under Kentucky statutes to bring a felony charge.

  • County paid utility bills for months after coroner moved

    Taxpayers continued to foot the bill for natural gas and electricity for months after the coroner’s office at Eagle Lake was closed.

    According to documents obtained by The Anderson News, the Anderson County Fiscal Court approved payments totaling just over $1,000 from the time the coroner’s office was moved to the Extension building in the county park in July of 2015 through June 1 of this year.

    Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton called continuing to pay those utility bills an “oversight.”

  • Elfin magic?

    If you live in Lawrenceburg, you may have seen Mary Cappello zipping around town in her ELF — a bright orange, odd-looking contraption that is actually a bike, but looks more like a bike trailer for a child.

    “People stop me all the time,” she said with a smile.

    Cappello bought the ELF after a leg injury left her immobile. Pedaling the ELF helped in her recovery.

    “I was laid up for about a year and a half and had gained a lot of weight,” she explained. “(Using the ELF daily) also helped me lose 150 pounds.”