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Local News

  • Glass is named new ACHS principal

    Chris Glass is no stranger to the Anderson County school system. Soon, he’ll likely be no stranger to most people in Anderson County.

    Glass was tabbed to be the next principal of Anderson County High School by the ACHS Site-Based Decision Making Council Friday.

    Glass is a 1993 ACHS graduate and he’s served as a teacher and administrator in the school system for nearly 13 years, most recently as associate principal at ACHS. He’s been serving as interim principal throughout the 2013-14 school year.

  • Returning to the scene of the crime

    Lawrenceburg Police Detective Jeremy Cornish got the criminal version of a Tic Tac double-whack pack when he interviewed suspected thief Johnathan Michael Powell on March 22.

    Powell, 21, admitted to burglarizing the local Taco Bell in January while being questioned about an attempted robbery of Taco Bell employees earlier that day.

  • Judge: Bluegrass Pipeline can’t take land

    By Tom Loftus
    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT, Ky. — Developers of the controversial Bluegrass Pipeline do not have the legal authority to condemn land to pipe natural gas liquids across Kentucky, a judge ruled Tuesday.

    In an 18-page order, Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd granted a summary judgment in favor of the group Kentuckians United to Restrain Eminent Domain, or KURE, which has fought the pipeline project.

  • Anderson 16th healthiest of Ky. counties

    Kentucky Press News Service
    and staff reports

    FRANKFORT — Oldham County ranks healthiest in Kentucky, according to the fifth annual County Health Rankings, released by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute.

    The rankings are available at CountyHealthRankings.org.

  • Magistrates or mathematicians?

    Reviewing bids for Anderson County Parks & Recreation softball shirts and caps took up nearly all of Anderson County Fiscal Court’s regular monthly meeting Tuesday.

    Because bids were not formatted the same, magistrates had to calculate potential total costs for each of the four bids. At one point, Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway had to call a Parks & Recreation official on his mobile phone to get an estimate for the various sizes that might be needed, because the shirts were bid at youth and adult sizes and in various colors.

  • Shelby Co. company will close doors after 42 years

    By Lisa King
    The Sentinel-News

    After 42 years, a longtime Shelby County company will close its doors in June because of a conflict with the building’s landlord, company officials say.

    Cenveo, headquartered in Texas, last year, purchased National Envelope Company, which has been located at 252 Pearce Industrial Road since 1972.

    A spokesperson for Cenveo announced the plant’s closing recently.

  • Beshear signs bill banning sale of e-cigarettes to children

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – Calling the measure a big win for efforts to reduce tobacco use in the state and particularly among young people, Gov. Steve Beshear signed Senate Bill 109 into law, banning the sale of all types of e-cigarettes to minors.

    The governor had specifically urged legislators to pass the bill during his State of the Commonwealth in January, and identified the effort as a key part of his legislative agenda.

  • Local teen and her horse make voyage through Trail of Tears

    What started out as a method to differentiate herself to gain entry to law school has become a journey of education and self discovery for 17-year-old Emma Swendsen who will take a more than two-month long horseback journey through the Trail of Tears.

  • City Council discusses process on equalization basin project

    An update on the equalization basin project and a recommendation for a zoning change to a property within city limits were the major line items on the Lawrenceburg City Council agenda Monday night.

  • It's wild, but it's no turkey

    Fred Cubberly grinned from ear to ear as he sampled Wild Turkey’s Kentucky Spirit in the distillery’s tasting room Friday. His bliss wasn’t born entirely from the bourbon. He’d only had an ounce or two. It was born out of the pleasure of simply being at Wild Turkey in Lawrenceburg.