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Local News

  • Wooldridge is new Saffell Street principal

    Saffell Street Elementary Site-Based Decision Making Council unanimously named Todd Wooldridge new principal Wednesday of last week.

    According to Sheila Mitchell, Anderson County Schools superintendent, 13 of 31 applicants for the position were interviewed.

    Wooldridge comes from Franklin County where he currently serves as interim principal at Elkhorn Elementary School. Prior to that, he worked at Hearn Elementary as an intermediate classroom teacher.

  • Kentucky’s overall jobless rate has risen slightly

    Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary unemployment rate has risen slightly to 7.9 percent from 7.8 percent, according to the Office of Employment and Training.

    The preliminary jobless rate was 0.4 percentage points below the 8.3 percent rate recorded for the state this time last year.

    The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate remained unchanged at 6.7 percent compared to a month ago, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

  • Corrections and clarifications

    In last week’s issue, a Wild Turkey product – American Honey – was incorrectly called Golden Honey in a story about Wild Turkey Master Distiller Jimmy Russell’s 60th Anniversary at the local distillery.

    American Honey was actually called Wild Turkey Honey Liqueur when it was introduced in 1978. It was re-packaged and re-named American Honey in 2006.

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    A student’s name was inadvertently left off the high honor list. Lauren Emmons, a fourth grader, received all A’s Honor Roll.
     

  • Prom preparation
  • Lewis awarded KDLA grant to code county ordinances

    The Kentucky Department of Libraries and Archives recently announced that Bobbi Lewis, Anderson County Attorney, received a $9,100 grant to preserve and manage local government records.

    Anderson County is one of 51 KDLA grant recipients for the 2014 fiscal year, totaling to the amount of $1,067,144, according to a Kentucky and Workforce Development Cabinet press release.

  • Gratitude for growers

    Jimmy Disponett, 77, has lived his entire life farming in Anderson County, and there is no place he’d rather call home.

    He attempted to move to Florida and enjoy retirement, but Disponett wasn’t all that comfortable with retiring. He loved the satisfaction he got from working his farmland and putting in an honest day’s work. After three years in Florida, he moved back to Kentucky.

    “I love the country,” said Disponett with a smile. “I can still outwork any 20-year-old.”

  • Anderson native living a life dream singing gospel music

    Jeremy Dickerson is simply living a dream.

    The Anderson County native always knew he wanted to sing Southern Gospel music. Now, he's making his living doing what he loves.

    “When I was growing up, that is all we listened to at home,” Dickerson says. “My dad (Denny Dickerson) was well established singing gospel music in the area. My mom (Kathy Wade) has been singing in the area a long time.

    “I knew I would like to try it.”

  • Employees were bound with duct tape during O’Reilly robbery

    Just before 10 p.m. on Monday, Lawrenceburg Police Officers responded to an armed robbery at O’Reilly Auto Parts, located at 1191 Glensboro Road.

    Trooper Matt Rogers, Detective Jeremy Cornish, Officer Joe Massey and Officer James Dunn arrived at the scene. They discovered that two white males dressed in dark clothing entered the store just before closing.

  • Salvisa teen expands education through job at Ale 8

    Ashley Robe, a Salvisa native and senior at Eastern Kentucky University, prepares for the future through cooperative education with Ale-8-One Bottling Company. Robe the daughter of, Mike and Melissa Robe, joined the team in August of 2013.  She works events around Kentucky where she gets to know Ale-8-One fans and introduces Kentucky's Soft Drink to those who have never tried it.

  • Tornadoes of '74 were most violent ever

    It was called the Super Outbreak. For 24 hours, tornadoes plowed through the U.S. and a portion of Canada on April 3 and 4 in 1974.

    At the time, it was the largest outbreak ever with 148 confirmed tornadoes in 13 states and the province of Ontario. The outbreak from April 25 through 28 in 2011 topped that but the 1974 storm is still considered the most violent with 30 F4 and F5 tornadoes reported.

    Damages were in excess of $600 million and the death toll hit 319 as a 2,600-mile swath was cut through the Midwest and parts of the East and South.