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Local News

  • Corned beef, venison make great St. Paddy’s meals

    The modern world has no shortage of stereotypes and misconceptions. When it comes to religions, nationalities, race, social status, the information or lack of is astounding. What complicates this situation is the extreme sensitivity and ability to be offended.

    I’m a pretty easy-going person and it takes a lot to get my dander up. Speaking of which, I’m of Irish decent which I am very proud of. Part of my family arrived on Ellis Island in New York in the late 1800s.

  • Taylor with Rotary, Masons, wife more than 50 years

    80 YEARS AGO

    Thursday, March 18, 1937

    Paul Weekly purchased the Warren restaurant and pool room from Taylor Brothers and took possession last Saturday.

    Lee Britton, game warden for Anderson and Mercer counties, distributed 28 pairs of quail into different sections of Anderson County. About 50 more pairs were to be distributed within the next two weeks.

    Britton said he would not put any quail on farms that were posted, but only on farms that hunting would be allowed.

  • Gaines meets gospel star

    Anderson County resident Alonzo Gaines hams it up with award-winning gospel singer Ronnie Booth following The Booth Brothers concert at Sand Spring Baptist Church last Thursday. The group is known for its harmony-drenched vocals and warm, easy voices, according to the group’s website. The group has earned awards including album, son and trio of the year and favorite artists of the year.

  • If you’re going to Heaven, better be able to prove it

    Several years ago, I met a most interesting man camped alongside the roadway. His name is Randy Boehmer and he travels across the country with his two covered wagons, four very large maules and one small dog.

    Randy is sort of a typical cowboy type of good humor, and could do a few rope tricks. On the side of his covered wagon in large red letters is painted “Jesus Saves, Ask Him.” My curiosity overcame me and I simply had to stop and check this guy out.

  • Ag Credit celebrates grand opening in Frankfort

    A sizeable contingent of Anderson County officials were on hand last Wednesday to celebrate the grand opening of Ag Credit in Frankfort.

    Ag Credit, which previously serviced Anderson County from its Lexington and Danville locations, is now close by, offering agriculture-based loans and advice.

    “We are pleased with the turnout, particularly from Anderson County,” said Jim Caldwell, president and CEO of Ag Credit, who noted that the location on U.S. 127 in Frankfort works well for farmers in both counties.

  • She’s the boss

    Taylor Cook might be a 16-year-old junior at Anderson County High School, but that didn’t stop her from opening her own business.

    With help from the Future Farmers Association (FFA), she was inspired to open Taylor Belle’s after completing a supervised agricultural experience project about two years ago. Taylor Belle’s is a licensed and insured mobile ice cream trailer that serves hand dipped ice cream cones at local events.

  • Girl, 15, beaten, slashed over Facebook spat

    A 15-year-old Lawrenceburg girl was beaten and slashed several times with a steak knife by a man who became angry when she looked at an ex-boyfriend’s Facebook page, according to police reports.

    Ryan L. Smith, 18, of Fayetteville, North Carolina was charged with first-degree unlawful imprisonment and second-degree assault in the March 8 incident that occurred on Djeddah Drive.

    Smith and the juvenile were in what police called a “sexual relationship” after meeting on the social media website.

  • Dead recycling building to be county morgue

    Having already killed the reason for which it was built, the Anderson County Fiscal Court has decided to turn a portion of its recycling building into a morgue.

    Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton confirmed the decision last week, saying work will begin soon to configure a portion of the building into a morgue.

    “We are going to section off about 16 feet in one of the bay areas, all the way to the back wall,” Gritton said. “It already has working water, an eyewash station and a drain.”

  • Troopers meet ‘Red Power Ranger’
  • ‘He was a banjo man’

     

    It’s only fitting that Greg Breeding’s friends told him goodbye by playing bluegrass music during his funeral service last week at Ritchie & Peach Funeral Home.

    Breeding, who gained a considerable following playing banjo with a host of bluegrass bands since the mid-1970s, passed away March 4 following an illness.

    He was 62.

    “He was a banjo man,” said fellow musician and Lawrenceburg resident Marty Harley, who met Breeding in the late 1970s and spent the past two decades playing music with him.