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Local News

  • News briefs: 5-15-13

    Truck tuggers’ first
    meet is Saturday
    The Kentucky Truck Tuggers will hold its first tug of the season Saturday, May 18 at Eagle Lake Convention Center, the group announced.
    The tug will benefit Relay for Life.
    Start time is 6 p.m.
    Admission is $8, with children under 5 admitted free.
    The tug will feature several classes, including three sanctioned classes: 4,200 pound 4x4, 5,500 pound 2-wheel drive, and 6,000 pound 4x4. It will also include local stock classes.

  • District begins search for middle school, ECC principals

    The Anderson County school district seeks the community’s input as it begins its search to fill two principal positions for the 2013-2014 school year.
    Members of the Anderson County middle school’s site-based decision-making council voted to offer an online survey for “stakeholders” — those parents, students staff and residents with a vested interest in the middle school — as the council evaluates principal candidates.

  • Council approves first reading of $3.559M budget

    The city council unanimously approved the first reading of its $3.559 million budget for the upcoming fiscal year, a $43,400 increase.
    The budget’s expenses for health insurance may need to be adjusted, according to Mayor Edwinna Baker during the finance committee meeting Monday afternoon, because of delays in receiving health insurance rates for employees.
    Baker said the expenditures for employees’ health insurance will change and most likely be higher once the city receives health insurance rate information by June 1.

  • Council to discuss $2M detention basin project, ‘glass mountain’

    The city’s wastewater treatment plant can handle increased water flow during heavy rains.  
    For now, according to Public Works Director Larry Hazlett.
    Processing a little more than 1.8 million gallons of wastewater on a normal day, the city wastewater treatment plant has averaged 10 million gallons per day during wet weather conditions, about 1 million gallons more than the plant’s maximum capacity of 9.9 million.

  • City council squashes historic district plan

    The city council voted 4-1 to reject the historic district commission’s proposal for an historic district in the city of Lawrenceburg.
    Council member George Geoghegan, former historic district commission chairman and sole dissenting vote, was the only council member to speak prior to the council’s vote.

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  • Waddy church to host gun shoot

    Skeet and rifle shooting is about fellowship.
    And ultimately, about spreading God’s word, according to Mt. Vernon Baptist Church chairman Garry Gaines.
    Mt. Vernon Baptist Church of Waddy is hosting its first Spring Shoot and Game Day this Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. featuring skeet, rimfire pistol and rimfire rifle shoots for children and adults of all ages.

  • Nine-year-old poultry farmer hits pay dirt

    She bought her new iPad, paid off her grandfather and even had enough left to purchase another batch of chicks.
    Leah Zimmerman, 9, the subject of a front page article in the April 17 edition of The Anderson News that featured her efforts to replace a broken iPad by raising and selling chickens, has hit pay dirt, according to an e-mail from her father, John.
    He said they took the chicks to the twice-monthly chicken swap held in the West Park Shopping Plaza parking lot, but rain shortened it and she only sold eight of the 100 chicks she had purchased.

  • Lawrenceburg man charged with 139 counts of legend drug

    A Lawrenceburg man is scheduled to be arraigned Tuesday in Anderson District Court on 139 counts of possession of a legend drug and leaving the scene of an accident, according to court documents on file.
    John T. Ivey, 21, of 1497 Aaron Barnett Road, was served April 12 with a grand jury summons on an incident that occurred last December when the car he was driving crashed into a home on Fox Creek Road, reportedly causing severe damage.
    Ivey allegedly fled before being tracked down by Anderson County Sheriff’s Deputy Tony Likens.

  • Not your average college student

    Don’t dare waste class time around Roy Dearmon.
    When Dearmon, 83, sees a student not paying attention to the college instructor  —
    He won’t slap them like he might have as a special forces instructor in the Army.
    Dearmon gives them advice.
    “They’re daydreaming when they should be listening, I’ll tell them about it,” Dearmon said.
    Time won’t stop for you, he said.
    Time didn’t stop for Dearmon.
    Learning isn’t going to stop for him, either.