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Local News

  • ‘A lot of memories are gone’
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  • News briefs: 6-20-12

    Experimental Aircraft Association offers free airplane rides
    The Experimental Aircraft Association will offer free airplane rides Saturday, June 23 at Capital City airport, located at 90 Airport Road in Frankfort, starting at 10 a.m.
    The rides will be open to children ages 8-17.
    There will also be a free pancake breakfast before the first plane ride at 10 a.m.
    For information on the event, contact 502-319-2438.

    Critic praises Four Roses

  • Finding more than distilleries on the Bourbon Trail

    By Meaghan Downs
    News staff
    Travelers with a taste for the arts can find more than liquor on the Bourbon Trail.
    Ask two Lawrenceburg business owners — art connoisseur Brenda Gardner and potter Susan Burge — who opened two studios on Bonds Mill Road in the hopes of attracting tourists (and locals) to support Kentucky art.  
    Burge, a former painter turned potter who has been making pottery for about 15 years, had been selling her clay pottery out of her barn on Johnson Road and participating in art shows for years.

  • 140th fair, horse show begins Saturday

    From staff reports
    The 140th annual Lawrenceburg Fair and Horse Show will begin its week of horse shows, pageants and carnival rides this Saturday, June 23 with the gates opening at noon at the fairgrounds.
    The Fair and Horse Show, set to run June 23 through June 30, features a variety of entertainment, competition and attractions, including a few new events.
    The Fair and Horse Show has one of the largest outdoor saddle horse shows in the world, offering saddlebreds, miniature horses, hackneys and roadsters.

  • Recycling to get easier this fall

    By Ben Carlson
    News staff
    Recycling efforts in Anderson County will take a mighty leap forward this fall, thanks to a state grant and the efforts of the Anderson County Environmental Committee.
    The state announced last week that the county will receive a $125,291 grant, enough to fuel plans the committee has worked on since it was formed last April by the Anderson County Fiscal Court.

  • City council kicks judges, others out of reserved parking spots

    County officials — including Anderson County’s district and circuit court judges — might find themselves circling Main Street in the weeks to come to find a parking spot close to the courthouse.   
    County Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway recently received a letter from the city council to remove the county’s reserved parking signs on Ollie Bowen Street.
    The same reserved parking signs, city council member Ken Evans said, that were never authorized by the city to be placed.

  • Steeplechase

    If worshippers feel small when they walk into Goshen Baptist Church, that’s just fine with Pastor Fred Knickerbocker.
    They are supposed to, thanks to a new steeple that was erected atop the church last Friday morning.
    Knickerbocker said the steeple, which is graced at the top with a gold cross, makes people feel small by design, but not in a negative way.
    “The closer [the steeple] gets to Heaven, the smaller it gets,” said Knickerbocker, who has said grace since 1977 over what is believed to be Anderson County’s oldest church.

  • Report questions psych drug use at Heritage Hall

    A watchdog group claims that a local nursing home is administering antipsychotic drugs to residents without a psychosis or related condition in an effort to keep staffing costs down.
    Kentuckians for Nursing Home Reform cites a nationwide study by the federal government that reveals nearly 1-in-5 residents at Heritage Hall without psychosis or related condition received antipsychotic drugs.
    The study was conducted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and released by last month by The Boston Globe.

  • On Writing

    The path to success in writing, for many Lawrenceburg authors, is paved with self-doubt, rejection and endless rough drafts.
    Several authors from Anderson County recently shared their stories on what it means to write, what they’re working on, and what they’re inspired by:   
     
     Jeanette Buser
    When Jeanette Buser was in school, she doodled fleas.
    Fleas jumping off of dogs. Fleas skiing, hang gliding, swimming.

  • Main, Broadway becoming more accessible

    Both Broadway and Main streets will be under construction this summer as the state Department of Transportation brings them up to code with Americans with Disabilities Act requirements.  
    According to Charlotte Faeth, the Danville Section Supervisor for Anderson, Boyle and Mercer counties, the project consists of asphalt resurfacing of two Lawrenceburg routes: a 1.62-mile section of US 62/S. Main Street to Woodford Street, and 3.64 miles from the US 127 Bypass to Broadway.