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Local News

  • Judge will question Beasmore juror

    Lea Beasmore wasn’t granted a new trial in her sexual harassment lawsuit against the fiscal court, but the judge didn’t say no, either.
    Beasmore, who was shut out by a jury in April when she sought $1.5 million for allegedly being sexually harassed and exposed to pornography and sexual devices while working in county government, is demanding a new trial based on her claim that one of the jurors in her trial, Carolyn Burton, is related to Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway, who was a magistrate during Beasmore’s employment with the county.

  • Forced beard-eating case back in court

    The man who last year forced another man to eat his own beard could be headed for prison.
    Troy Holt, 48, already on probation for the beard-eating incident, has since been convicted of violating a domestic violence order. He has also apparently failed to make $570 in court-ordered restitution to Willisburg Road Harvey Westmoreland, the man forced to eat his beard.

  • It's 'van-tastic!'

    The Anderson Humane Society’s animals will be riding in style, thanks to Toyota and YouTube.
    With the help of volunteers, one YouTube video and social networking, the Anderson Humane Society won a new Toyota Sienna minivan through the car company’s “100 Cars for Good” program.
    Donna Callahan, executive director of the Anderson Humane Society, learned of Toyota’s promotion in the beginning of March. She sent out an e-mail March 2, asking members to help draft a grant in order for the group to move on to the next stage of competition.

  • High school parking lot shooting an apparent suicide

    A Harrodsburg man shot and killed himself Thursday evening in the Anderson County High School parking lot, according Anderson County Coroner Mark Tussey.

    Paul Jenkins, 49, died from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head, Tussey said Friday morning.

    Tussey said there is no indication why Jenkins drove to the high school or Anderson County to commit the apparent act of suicide.

  • Class of 2011 celebrates
  • DARE Derby is Saturday

    This year’s annual DARE Fishing Derby will include a tournament designed for parents and their children to fish together.
    Scheduled for Saturday, June 4 at the lake near Hope Community Church, there will be a mini-tournament from 8 to 9:30 a.m., the proceeds from which will benefit the Kentucky Sheriff’s Boys and Girls Ranch. Adult entry into the mini-tournament will be $10. Children under 15 can fish for free for the mini- tournament and regular derby, which runs from 8 to 11 a.m.

  • Slingin’ some mud

    It won’t be pretty, it won’t be clean, but it sure is going to be fun.
    A mud bog to benefit the local Shop With a Cop program and the Kentucky Sheriff’s Association Boys and Girls Camp is scheduled for Saturday at Anderson Community Park.
    The brainchild of Deputy Tony Likins, the bog will begin at 1 p.m. Registration for competitors is $20 and begins at 10 a.m. Admission is $5, and children 10 and under will be admitted free.

  • Man in coma following mule wagon wreck

    A Lawrenceburg man remains in critical condition Tuesday after a mule wagon accident last Wednesday on Paxton Road.
    Brian “Little Brian” Perry, 21, and a friend, Josh “Worm” Thompson, were driving the wagon hitched to a team of pony mules when something spooked the animals.
    The buggy turned over at least once and landed in a ditch, seriously injuring Perry, who was airlifted to the University of Kentucky Medical Center.
    Thompson was treated and released.

  • Lawrenceburg remembers fallen heroes

    Thirteen more flags were raised Sunday to honor Kentucky soldiers killed in the war on terrorism as American Legion Post 34 and its Auxiliary commemorated Memorial Day.
    The hour-long, somber ceremony featured a keynote address by Brig. Gen. Steven Hogan, who honored those who have given their lives in defense of the United States.
    “God bless and care for these brave souls,” he said.

  • County buys old health building

    Shift change at the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office often resembles the old 1960s gag when a dozen or so people would pile into a tiny car in an effort to break some world record or another.
    With four or more deputies sharing each desk and scarcely enough room to turn around, the office is too small by half, but that soon won’t be the case.
    The Anderson County Fiscal Court pulled a surprising move Friday morning and voted unanimously to end overcrowding at the sheriff’s office by purchasing the former health department building on Main Street.