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Local News

  • Judge sets bond, says Tindal is ‘a threat to the community’

    The case involving violent text message threats made against a female student and the Anderson County High School will now be referred to the Anderson County Grand Jury.
    James R. Tindal, 19, of 1430 Van Buren Road, appeared in Anderson County District Court last Thursday morning for a preliminary hearing and is charged with 18 counts of third-degree terroristic threatening, one count of second-degree terroristic threatening and 41 counts of harassing communications.

  • Eighth graders score well, sophomores slump on test

    Anderson County school administrators have cause for celebration, as well as room for improvement, when it comes to examining the school district’s EXPLORE and PLAN test results.
    The Kentucky Department of Education recently released public school district scores for the pre-ACT assessments EXPLORE and PLAN, both tests used to predict the college and career-readiness of eighth and 10th graders.

  • ‘Coke’ and a frown

    A Lexington woman was arrested after Lawrenceburg police say they found 41 grams of cocaine in her car during a traffic stop on US 127 Bypass, according to a report issued last week by the Lawrenceburg Police Department.
    Amanda D. Cutter, 33, was charged with first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance and transported to the Shelby County Detention Center.
    Cutter was also charged with a seat belt violation, failure to use a child restraint device in vehicle and failure to notify DOT of an address change.

  • Bungee jumpers buy high bridge, plan reality TV show

    Anderson County draws tens of thousands of visitors each year on a pilgrimage to walk the hallowed grounds of Kentucky’s bourbon trail.
    It could soon be drawing pilgrims of a different sort — the kind who like to leap from very tall bridges.
    Young’s High Bridge, the old train trestle that runs parallel to the S bridge over the Kentucky River in Tyrone, has been purchased by a group of investors intent on making Anderson County the premier destination for bungee jumpers, and perhaps the center of a reality TV show.

  • Two busted for stealing scrap metal

    Two people were arrested last Monday after police say they were caught trying to steal scrap metal from a location on Hammond’s Creek Road.
    Arrested were Daniel J. King, 37, of 246 Woodhill, Frankfort, and Brandy N. Woods, 36, of 104 Parker Place, Georgetown. Both are charged with theft by unlawful taking and third-degree criminal trespassing, according to citations issued by the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office.

  • King on state pension fix: ‘There will be a lot of mad people’

    At least 1,200 state government retirees living in Anderson County are holding their collective breath as the legislature weighs how to fix a pension fund that could be bankrupt four years from now.
    The pension system, by some estimates underfunded by as much as $20 billion, is teetering on the brink of solvency and legislators are working on a plan they say could save it for years to come.

  • Sculptor, family create horse out of snow

    Most folks look at their snow-covered yards and grimace, waiting for it to melt.
    Donna Devers looks at it as an opportunity to do something she loves: sculpt.
    Devers, her daughter Kayla Higgins and grandsons Camdon and Calen Higgins, took advantage of last weekend’s snowfall, using the white stuff to sculpt a remarkably lifelike horse Sunday afternoon behind her home on Dejeddah Drive in Lawrenceburg.

  • News briefs: 2-6-13

    Retired teachers to meet
    The Anderson County Retired Teachers will meet Monday, Feb. 11 at noon at Foliage Restaurant for lunch.
    “Please join us as we will be updated on news of our state legislature and issues regarding retired teachers,” according to the group’s press release.
    The Anderson County Retired Teachers will also be collecting money to donate to Backpack Buddies.  

    Barr staff will available here each month

  • New state law allows firearms in govt. buildings

    It’s always been legal to walk around Lawrenceburg openly carrying a firearm.
    A state law that went into effect several weeks ago now makes it legal to walk into nearly every public building carrying a firearm, too.
    The law, which proclaims only the state can regulate firearms, breezed through the general assembly and was signed into law by the governor last spring. It effectively ends the ability of city and county governments to restrict people from openly carrying firearms into their offices.

  • Out of classroom and into the fire

    Junior firefighters don’t take pop quizzes or fill-in-the-bubble tests.
    The real test, according to junior firefighter Cassie Rowe, is at the scene of a structure fire or car crash.
    Firefighters need to be calm. Firefighters should be able to talk to people.  
    Developing both skills can be hard to take out of theory in trainings and put into practice, she said.  
    “If you ever roll up on a fire scene, you better know what you’re doing,” Cassie, a senior at Anderson County High School, said.