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Local News

  • Judge orders doody duty for restroom vandals

    They probably would have preferred to go to jail.
    Four teens who allegedly smeared feces on commodes and damaged a restroom in the county park were ordered by Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway to clean it up Monday afternoon.
    With a deputy and some of their parents standing watch, the teens were forced to scrub fecal matter off the floor, commodes and walls, as well as clean up other messes they made Saturday afternoon.

  • Fire destroys home on Glensboro Road

    Firefighters never stood a chance Monday afternoon when a fire flattened a home at 2300 Glensboro Road.

    Anderson County Fire Chief Mike Barnes was at the scene just minutes after the fire was called into 911, but the home, owned by Timmy Perry, was already fully engulfed in flames.

    Barnes said it doesn’t appear that anyone, including three children who live at the residence, was home at the time of the fire.

  • Rotary pancake breakfast to be held this Saturday

    The Rotary Club of Lawrenceburg will host its annual pancake breakfast Saturday, March 2 from 7 a.m. to noon at the Anderson County Middle School cafeteria, the club announced.
    The breakfast, now in its 56th year, is one of the club’s biggest annual fundraisers, with proceeds used to support the Rotary’s annual scholarship fund.
    Cost is $7, and children under 5 are free.
    Tickets are available through Rotarians or at the door.
     

  • Waiting for white smoke

    Instead of the pope, think of a grandfather.
    Which is how the Rev. Chris Clay of St. Lawrence Catholic Church said he reacted to news of Pope Benedict XVI’s unexpected resignation.
    “I was very surprised, I was actually very emotional about it,” Clay, who learned about the resignation in an e-mail from the diocese, said. “I think was overcome with what he was doing, how almost unprecedented.”

  • Library’s coffers grow despite lower tax rates

    Auditors reviewing the Anderson Public Library’s finances from last fiscal year have given the library a clean audit for 2012, according to Library Director Pam Mullins.
    Library board trustees discussed the 2012 independent audit last Tuesday, unanimously choosing to table an approval of the audit until the board’s March meeting to read it more closely.
    “I think it’d be a wise choice, just to look over it,” current library board president Bryan Proctor said during the meeting.

  • Recycling building bids meet fiscal court’s budget

    It appears the fiscal court will build a new recycling building after all.
    All but one of the six bids that were opened during last Tuesday night’s fiscal court meeting were at or below the amount the fiscal court has approved to spend on the building.
    A previous bidding process for a larger building came in at least twice as much as was budgeted, leaving the project in limbo as the court searched for ways to downgrade the building and save labor costs.

  • Sheriff may take over business licenses

    Fresh off news that its plans to do away with business license would also end its lucrative insurance premium tax, the fiscal court is now considering turning enforcement and collection over to the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office.
    That would be a dramatic switch from the way those licenses are handled now, which includes enforcement by the county’s code enforcement officer and collection by the county clerk’s office.

  • High school issues ‘soft lockdown’ after man flees Mercer cops

    Anderson County High School was under a “soft lockdown” for much of last Wednesday while local law enforcement searched for a man who fled from Mercer County authorities.
    Superintendent Sheila Mitchell said Wednesday morning that the district had a safety concern about an individual with possible connections to the high school, and that there was a probability the man would approach the high school campus.
    The “soft lockdown” involved increased security in the high school entryway and hallways as students transitioned from class to class.

  • Second Christian Church looks to future leaders

    At Second Christian Church, there’s no need to look far to find history.
    It’s in the colorful, traditional garb that congregation members wore to celebrate Black History Month during Sunday worship.
    It’s in the words of the Rev. Ramon E. Smith’s sermon.
     “You are our history, dear God,” Smith prayed during the Sunday church service on Feb. 24. “But we’re thankful we’ve got a history.”

  • Car blazes near Ward Elementary