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Local News

  • Playground ‘required’ at new ECC building

    The Parent Teacher Organization of the Early Childhood Center isn’t playing around when it comes to raising more than $60,000 by next school year for required playground equipment at the new childhood center.  
    “It’s at least been on our radar screen; we knew even then that it would be unlikely that the money was going to be appropriated for the playground,” Belinda Hardin, PTO president, said of the needed funding for the ECC playgrounds. “Even before they were breaking ground on building the new building, we were fundraising.”

  • Man’s mission is to find Anderson County’s unmarked soldiers

    Wayne Darnell, a Vietnam veteran, places American flags on every grave in Fairview cemetery. He’s done so for about 20 years.
    It’s important to him to remember those who have served their country, like his father did in World War II, and as his great great-grandfather did before him in the Civil War.
    “I’ve been interested since I’ve been this tall,” Darnell, holding his hand at knee-length, said.

  • Former cop may still be charged

    The off duty Lawrenceburg police officer who reportedly was intoxicated and mislead police following an accident earlier this month in Franklin County might be charged after all.
    Franklin County Attorney Rick Sparks issued a statement Friday, saying that the investigation into the accident remains open.
    “The Franklin County Attorney’s office is continuing to review the case to determine what, if any, charges should be filed,” Sparks said in a statement to The Anderson News.

  • School nurse cuts considered

    Harold Todd, health board chairman, requested $9,360 from the board of education at its special-called meeting Feb. 9 to allow school nurses to retain their full-time status and benefits.
    Todd cited the current financial woes of the health board, and its attempt to “right the ship” in combating the department’s $187,000 deficit.
    “As most of you know, especially from reading the paper, we’ve had extreme financial difficulties,” Todd said, addressing the board members.

  • Health director quits

    Embattled health director Brandon Hurley has quit, health board Chairman Harold Todd confirmed Monday morning.
    Hurley’s last day is today (Wednesday), and the Anderson County Board of Health is expected to name an interim replacement when it meets tonight at 6 p.m. at the health department.
    The health board is also expected finalize a state-approved plan to terminate at least one employee, move other employees from full- to part-time, and announce a series of furlough days. Those cuts are designed to eliminate an estimated $187,000 annual operating deficit.

  • Schools closed on Valentine's Day

    Anderson County Public Schools will be closed for school today, Feb. 14.

    According to the district's website, all schools in the Anderson County school district will be closed due to slick roads on the south side of Anderson County.

  • Judge tosses out redistricting; King remains ‘optimistic’

    State Rep. Kim King’s hopes of being able to run for re-election here and in Mercer and Spencer counties took another leap forward late Tuesday afternoon when a Franklin Circuit Judge tossed out controversial House Bill 1.
    That bill, passed earlier this year and signed into law by Gov. Steve Beshear, would have pushed King out of Anderson County because it divided her home county of Mercer.
    In his ruling, Judge Phillip Shepherd ordered that the filing deadline for House and Senate be extended once again, this time until Feb. 10.

  • Judge calls on library to save money, halt expansion

    The public library’s board of trustees should hang on to its available money, halt its expansion plans and not go into debt, Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway said during Tuesday’s meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court.
    Conway said he hoped the fiscal court would join him in sending a message to the library board in the form of a vote to encourage it to reserve its funds, pending the outcome of a lawsuit sweeping across northern Kentucky.

  • Giving nature a second chance

    Kentucky wildlife receive a second chance at Nature’s Haven, an Anderson County animal recovery center focused on rehabilitating infant mammals and releasing them back into the wild.
    Wildlife rehabilitator Robin Thompson, who has been managing the non-profit center for about a year, describes Nature’s Haven as a “wildlife hospice,” not a petting zoo or pest control.
    “They generally have one foot in the ground by the time we get to them,” she said.  

  • State OKs proposed health cuts, keeping health director part time

    State health officials have approved nearly $190,000 in payroll and other cuts proposed by the Anderson County Health Board’s finance committee, sources have confirmed.
    The spending cuts are designed to wipe out the department’s $185,000 annual operating deficit, and must still be approved by the full board of health. The board’s next meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15 at the health department, located on Glensboro Road.