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Local News

  • Family sues after mom’s corpse tumbles into grave

    A Lawrenceburg woman and her sisters are suing the operators of a cemetery in Franklin County after their mother’s corpse was “ejected” from her casket and tumbled to the bottom of her grave, according to a lawsuit filed Feb. 2 in Franklin Circuit Court by Louisville-based attorney Christopher Haden.
    Brenda Gardener and her sisters, Susan Nowak of Louisville and Ruth Ritter of Frankfort, are suing Indiana-based Saber Management, which operates Sunset Memorial Gardens, for undisclosed damages.

  • Driver collides with squad car after running red light

    Officer Joe Saunier, a city police officer, was released from the hospital Feb. 2 after sustaining injuries in traffic accident that morning.  
    The two-vehicle crash occurred a little after 8 a.m. at the intersection of Woodford and South Main Street on Feb. 2.
    Officer Jeremy Cornish, who said he witnessed the collision, said a female driver, the sole passenger of the vehicle, was traveling east on Woodford Street when her brakes allegedly malfunctioned.

  • ‘Let the good times roll’

    New Orleans’ annual Mardi Gras parade begins when the mayor announces in French “laissez les bons temps rouler” or “let the good times roll.”
    Michael Williams, owner of Mardi Gras Donuts, adopted the same mission statement for his doughnut shop, styled after the place where his journey with doughnuts began.  
    Williams has received plenty of praise and press for his doughnuts back in the Big Easy.

  • Mission accomplished

    Surviving simply wasn’t enough for Lawrenceburg’s General Cable plant.
    Faced with the daunting reality that telecommunication products — the cables strung between phone poles — were going the way of the dodo bird, employees at the worldwide company’s local plant vowed to be its “last plant standing” — a mission to outperform and outlive its sister plants.
    Mission accomplished.

  • Thrill of victory, agony of defeat

    The Pinewood Derby is much more than a race, according to assistant Cub Master Dean Kendrick of Pack 38.
    “As the leaders of the pack strive to improve the derby each year, we hope the scouts will see that and strive to improve their cars each year.
    “The official Cub Scout motto is ‘Do Your Best,’ and we sincerely hope we are successful in teaching this important life lesson to our scouts,” Kendrick said via e-mail.

  • Rogers doesn’t file for re-election

    Anderson County will have a new Circuit Court clerk next year.
    Jan Rogers, who has held the position since 1994, confirmed Monday that she will not run for re-election.
    One of her assistants, Pam Robinson, a Democrat, confirmed that she is running for the seat.
    Robinson, who was required to pass a test to run for the office, is the only one who filed by Tuesday’s deadline.
    “I’ve been here a long time,” Robinson said, adding that she has worked in the office for 19 years. “I’ll have big shoes to fill.”

  • King wins round one in battle to keep seat

    A Franklin County Circuit Court judge issued a temporary injunction Tuesday afternoon to delay the filing deadline for state legislative candidates through Feb. 7.
    That ruling keeps alive state Rep. Kim King’s hopes of keeping her seat in Anderson County after a redistricting plan signed into law last week pushed her out.
    “I’m very pleased,” said King, who represents Anderson County as part of the 55th District.

  • A downtown fixture

    Jim Hyatt didn’t grow up thinking he would own Lawrenceburg’s only pool room.
    More than 40 years later, he couldn’t imagine doing anything else.
    Hyatt, the 76-year-old proprietor of Jim’s Pool Room on Main Street, has been slinging hamburgers and coney dogs while chatting up neighbors and fellow University of Kentucky fans for decades.
    “I should retire, but I’ve been doing it so long,” he said, standing behind the pool room’s well-worn wooden bar. “I like doing it.”

  • Coming Wednesday: General Cable struts its stuff
  • New ECC building too small

    The Ezra B. Sparrow Early Childhood Center will be completed by next school year, offering new technology and a new building, but not enough square feet.
    According to Superintendent Sheila Mitchell, some early childhood programs or classrooms at the current ECC will need to relocate to individual district elementary schools next school year due to lack of space at the newly constructed center.