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Local News

  • 'Doobie' found guilty

    Paul “Doobie” Dearinger was convicted this afternoon (Wednesday) on a second-degree cruelty to animals charge, sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $500.

    The six-person jury announced its decision around 3:45 p.m. in Anderson District Court, bringing the case of a murdered 8-month-old puppy to a close.

  • Historic district commission moves forward with proposal

    The historic district commission voted unanimously to move forward with its original recommendation for Lawrenceburg’s proposed historic district area, only adding one specific provision regarding potential demolition of buildings owned by First Baptist Church.
    About 17 Lawrenceburg citizens, many of whom represented First Baptist Church, attended the historic district commission’s Jan. 17 public meeting.

  • Honoring their fallen ‘brothers’

    The funeral of Charles Woods Jr. in 2009 was not the first fireman’s funeral Keith Nowlin attended and participated in.
    It was, however, the first time the idea of establishing an honor guard for the city of Lawrenceburg's fire and rescue squad started to gain traction.
    Two years later, after receiving approval from Chief Robert Hume and attending a 16-hour precision drill course in Elizabethtown, Nowlin said Anderson County’s first honor guard is ready to serve.  

  • Child porn suspect gets new court date

    By Lisa King
    Landmark News Service
    A new pre-trial date have been set a Lawrenceburg man charged with sex-related crimes against children.
    Mark Hawks of Lawrenceburg, is facing more than 100 child pornography charges in Shelby and Anderson counties.
    In Shelby Circuit Court Monday, Circuit Judge Charles Hickman set  Jan. 20 as the next scheduled court date for Hawks, 55, of 402 Secretariat Drive in Lawrenceburg.

  • Mustang memorial dedicated to late middle school teacher

    Anderson County Middle School dedicated a Mustang memorial in honor of former teacher Lynda Richardson, an instructor who died at the beginning of this school year.
    Richardson had taken a medical leave of absence from the school, principal Gina Fultz said.
    “She was a big part of our building, larger than life. It was something that we wanted, something that resembles what she stood for,” Fultz said of the memorial.

  • Farmer injured when vehicle smacks tractor

    A tobacco farmer in western Anderson County was airlifted to an area hospital after the tractor he was driving was rear-ended by a vehicle Sunday night.
    Christopher Conway received a head injury after being thrown from his tractor, but was home by Monday and expected to recover.
    Conway was driving his tractor near the intersection of Highway 248 and Fairview Road when a vehicle struck it from behind. The tractor flipped and was struck by a second vehicle.
    No injuries were reported to the drivers of either vehicle.

  • Local Green Beret retires after 27 years

    Army Col. Kenneth J. Hurst has retired after completing 27 years of active duty military service, according to a news release.
     Hurst was a Special Forces officer. His most recent assignment was as the chief of plans for US Special Operations Command at MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa, Fla., from 2008-11. In 2009, from March through July, Hurst also served as the deputy commander for the US Special Operations Command, Europe, Stuttgart, Germany.

  • ‘One-man crime wave,’ others out of prison

    A convict once described by a prosecutor as a “one-man crime wave in Anderson County” was among the nearly 1,000 inmates released by the state Jan. 3 under House Bill 463.
    The bill, which was passed to reduce prison costs statewide, also led to the release of a half dozen people convicted in Anderson County of forgery and drug possession charges, along with one man imprisoned following his third DUI conviction.

  • Police collar star witness in trial of alleged puppy killer

    The trial of suspected puppy killer Paul “Doobie” Dearinger is officially on for today (Wednesday), but just barely.
    Police in Nicholasville were able to collar what figures to be the prosecution’s star witness in the case, Elizabeth “Beth” Dennis, just hours before a deadline imposed by a judge to postpone the case until March.

  • We’re No. 1! (in binge drinking)

    By Tara Kaprowy
    Kentucky Health News
    Kentuckians binge drink an average of about six times per month, more often than people living in any other state, a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.
    Binge drinking is defined as consuming four or more drinks for women and five or more drinks for men on one occasion. Nationwide, 17 percent of adults binge drink, up from 15 percent in a 2009 survey. That’s one in six people, averaging four binges a month and eight drinks per binge.