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Local News

  • Better results expected in audit of schools

    After last November’s district audit Superintendent Sheila Mitchell faced $1.1 million in excess spending by Anderson County Schools, leading to a pay increase freeze for staff and 13 terminated teaching positions.
    This year, however, Mitchell said she believes Anderson County Schools have met their goal of cutting 5 percent from every department across the budget.
     “We’ve worked very hard on it,” Mitchell said regarding the 2010-11 school district’s budget. “Our goal is to set a budget and stick to it.”

  • Curbside pickup of recycling could end

    By Ben Carlson
    General Manager
    Getting recycled materials picked up by the county might soon be a thing of the past.
    The question now is will rural residents be the only ones shut out of having that service provided, or will it also include those who live in the city.
    The Anderson County Fiscal Court last Tuesday voted unanimously to begin what will be an overhaul of its recycling program by selecting a recommendation from its recently formed environmental committee.

  • Damages, no injuries
  • 11 on 11-11-11

    Makayela Lewis is no stranger to the number 11.
    Born on Nov. 11 (11-11) in 2000, the Lawrenceburg youngster is celebrating her 11th birthday today, Nov. 11, 2011 (11-11-11).

    The next time the calendar will read 11-11-11 it will be Nov. 11, 2111.
    Here’s hoping that Makayela, who will turn 111 on the next 11-11-11, is still around to enjoy it.

  • ‘Why veterans serve’

    The veteran serves — whenever and wherever they’re called.
    At the American Legion Auxiliary Veterans Day service on Sunday, that sentiment was echoed in the prayers, the songs and the speeches made at Patriot Hall.
    Auxiliary Post 34 vice president Pam Rice spoke not only as a member of the Legion, but as a mother of a son in active duty.  
    Rice, who said her son will be returning from Iraq in two weeks, said she didn’t know what a veteran meant until her son was deployed.

  • Less hours, probation for embattled health director

    After three and a half hours in closed session, the Anderson County Board of Health voted 9-2 Thursday night to reduce health director Brandon Hurley’s full-time position to part-time status, including contingencies for a 90-day probationary period and improvement plan.
    Hurley and the board have come under public ire and scrutiny regarding the health department’s 2008 decision to build a new health department building as well as the department’s mounting debt.  

  • Beshear a clear choice here

    Anderson County voters chose incumbent Democrat Gov. Steve Beshear by a nearly 2-1 margin in Tuesday night’s statewide elections.

    Unofficial results show that Beshear pulled 50.23 percent of Anderson County votes, leaving challengers David Williams (R) with 25.99 percent and Gatewood Galbraith (I) with 23.78 percent.

    For results from each of Anderson County's voting precincts, see the graph that appears with this article.

    Beshear was easily re-elected Tuesday, and was joined by fellow Democrats in winning all but one of the statewide races.

  • Make sure Santa gets the message

    If you’ve been good this year, tell Santa all about it by submitting your letters to The Anderson News.

    For the 34th consecutive year, the News will help Santa by publishing the letters and pictures of Anderson County’s children.

    Santa only asks one thing. In order to make sure he can get through them all, please keep letters to 100 words.

    Letters should be e-mailed to santa@theandersonnews.com. Photos should be attached to the letters they accompany and should be saved in JPEG format.

  • Farmer vs. a farmer in race to replace Farmer for ag commissioner

    By Stephen Lega
    Landmark News Service
    One candidate to be Kentucky’s Commissioner of Agriculture has done stand-up comedy. His opponent thinks his campaign is a joke.
    The Democratic candidate, Robert “Bob” Farmer of Louisville operates his own marketing firm, in addition to his occasional comedy performances. James Comer of Monroe County, the Republican candidate, is a farmer who has also served as a state representative.

    James Comer

  • Secretary of State candidates believe in their backgrounds

    By Stephen Lega
    Landmark News Service
    Bill Johnson is running for Kentucky Secretary of State because he is concerned about the future of the Commonwealth. Alison Lundergan Grimes is running because  Kentuckians are hurting and she thinks they need and deserve strong leaders.
    Grimes, 32, the Democratic candidate, and Johnson, 44, the Republican candidate, will square off on Election Day, Nov. 8.

    Identification, please