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Local News

  • Water line breaks cause trouble for residents, workers

    Two city water line breaks, one starting last Thursday and another on Monday, have caused problems for residents, and the workers attempting to stem the leaks.  
    Public Works Director Larry Hazlett reported at the city council’s meeting Monday night that workers are attempting to fix a water line break underneath a section of the railroad tracks at the intersection of North Main and Center Street.  

  • Zoners want to shrink historic district, let owners opt out

    A discussion on creating a historic district in Lawrenceburg led to more questions than answers for the planning and zoning board last Tuesday night.
    What the board says it does know: Planning and Zoning can either recommend or not recommend the creation of a historic district in Lawrenceburg.
    The board must hold a public hearing in February, with affected property owners properly notified.
    The city council will have the final vote, and the ultimate power to establish the district, or dismiss the proposal entirely.

  • News briefs: 1-16-13

    Jacoby honored at The Citadel
    William Earl Jacoby of Lawrenceburg was recently honored for outstanding academic achievement at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, during the fall semester of the 2012-013 academic year, the college announced.
    Jacoby earned one of the college’s top academic honors, a Gold Star. Gold Stars are presented to students who achieve a 3.7 grade point average or higher during a semester’s course work.
    Gold Stars are worn on the collar of the cadet full dress and dress uniforms and the summer leave uniform.

  • Bound in black and white, a century of local history

    To understand Lawrenceburg’s future, start with the Kentucky River.
    Bill Bryant, Anderson County native and co-author of the pictorial history volume “Lawrenceburg,” opened to the first page of “Lawrenceburg” and a black and white photo of the river.
    Technically, it’s a rejuvenated spring that fell 300-400 feet from its original location, he says.
    The river is the same water source for the former Cedar Brook Distillery, which operated a water pipeline to the former Cedar Brook pump station.

  • Recycling building troubles leave magistrates stumped

    Just moments after being told by their highway foreman that water and gas lines for a new recycling building were about to be completed, fiscal court magistrates admittedly had more questions than answers about how, or if, that building will actually be built.
    The building, which was to be the centerpiece of the county’s burgeoning recycling program, has become a sore spot for magistrates after bids for it came in at more than twice the $325,000 they voted to spend to have it built.

  • Lawrenceburg man’s home seized in pill mill arrest

    A Lawrenceburg man was charged Monday with prescription drug and money laundering charges, according to an announcement from Attorney General Jack Conway and US Attorney Kerry B. Harvey.
    Ernest William Singleton, who owned a home in Lawrenceburg and a farm in Willisburg, Washington County, was arrested at the Washington County Sheriff’s Office and charged with conspiracy to distribute oxycodone and conspiracy to launder funds from October 2010 until January 2013.

  • County losing thousands in uncollected booze permits

    County government has for years failed to collect thousands of dollars in taxes by not enforcing an ordinance that requires stores selling packaged liquor and beer to purchase a license.
    Retailers that sell malt beverages such as beer are, by ordinance, required to purchase a $140 license each year. Those selling liquor are required to purchase a license for $400. Retailers selling both are required to purchase both.
    A quick count of locations selling packaged beer comes to roughly 25 in and around Lawrenceburg, along with five liquor stores.

  • Passions run high over gun control

    The nation is divided over the hotly contested issue of gun control, and Anderson County is no exception.
    As Americans hold their breath while waiting for the president to reveal his promised measures on gun control later this week, residents here aren’t shy on sharing their views, including one woman who vows no one will take away her firearms.

  • Rash of copper thefts under investigation

    A recent “rash” of copper thefts in the city prompted Police Chief Chris Atkins to ask the city council, and Lawrenceburg citizens as well, to look out for suspicious activity.
    Atkins reported the recent increase of copper thefts in the city during a departmental report at the city council’s Monday meeting.
    “They’re targeting specific items outside of residences and businesses,” Atkins said at the meeting.

  • School system reviews security in response to tragic shooting

    Following the tragic December school shooting in Newtown, Conn., many school districts across the country are beginning 2013 by re-evaluating their schools’ safety procedures.
    Anderson County is no exception.
    School Resource Officer Joe Saunier checked the locked door of a Saffell Street Elementary classroom Tuesday morning during a lockdown, one of several drills being conducted at Anderson County schools that day.