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Local News

  • Missing dog could be in Anderson County

    A Franklin County dog that has been missing for over a month may have been spotted in Anderson County, a volunteer involved in the search said Thursday morning.

    Copper, an 11-year-old Shiba Inu, was released into the wild on July 3 after being labeled as a coyote by a worker at the Franklin County Humane Society, said Barbara Murray, who is heading up the search effort for the dog.

    Murray said the last reported sighting of Copper occurred on the Anderson County side of Ninevah Road.

  • Incumbent mayor won't be challenged in November

    Lawrenceburg’s mayor is set for the next four years, but the council members she will be working with are yet to be determined.

    In order to run in the Nov. 2 general election, candidates had to file by last Tuesday, Aug. 10.

    Incumbent mayor Edwinna Baker is seeking reelection, but no one filed to challenge her this fall.

    However, 10 candidates filed for a chance at a spot on the six-seat city council.

  • Driver blames flip-flop for bus, car crack-up

    We’ve all heard about the dangers of drinking or texting while driving, but wearing flip-flops?

    Although there is certainly nothing illegal about wearing them behind the wheel, flip-flops are likely the cause of a wreck last Thursday afternoon when a small car hit and became lodge beneath the rear bumper of a school bus at the intersection of Saffell Street and Glensboro Road.

    No one was injured in the accident, and no students were aboard the bus.

  • Items swiped from road barn

    The Anderson County highway facility was burgled sometime over the weekend with thieves making off with a variety of tools and equipment.

    Highway foreman Chip Chambers said someone broke into the building by pushing an air conditioning unit through the window and climbing in.

    Chambers said items stolen include two chain saws, a pole saw, floor jacks, sockets and a pressure washer.

    Chambers said Monday he was still working to put together an estimated value of the equipment for the county’s insurance company.

  • COLUMN: A pain in the grass

    After spending the better part of four decades not trying to keep up with them, the Joneses finally caught me in their web of jealousy this spring.

    Their name isn’t actually Jones, but that’s not the point. Several families in my neighborhood had (past tense gleefully and firmly intended) lawns that would make even the Cincinnati Reds’ groundskeeper green with envy, and did exactly the same thing to me.

    They didn’t have dandelions poking their rotten yellow heads out of the ground only hours after they mowed.

  • Who's the best? You decide

    Honor your favorite Anderson County businesses by casting a ballot — or two — in the second annual “Best of Anderson” contest.

    Paper ballots can be found in the Aug. 4, 11 and 18 editions of The Anderson News, as well as the Aug. 9 and 16 editions of The Anderson News Extra.

    Only original paper ballots will be accepted; no copies are allowed.

    Votes can also be cast online at www.theandersonnews.com. Click here to vote.

  • Ag office cites county for spraying weeds

    The admission last Tuesday in fiscal court that a highway employee sprayed weed killer after his state certification expired has resulted in state charges against the county and sparked a political firestorm among judge-executive candidates.

    Highway foreman Chip Chambers, the Republican candidate for judge, admitted to the infraction during the meeting while being quizzed by Magistrate John Wayne Conway, a Democrat also running for judge.

  • City tax rate ticks higher

    Lawrenceburg homeowners received a 1.2 percent property tax rate increase Monday evening after the city council voted to accept what the state terms as a “compensating” tax rate.

    The ordinance establishing the tax rate was approved unanimously on first reading, and the council is expected to vote on the ordinance on second reading at its next monthly meeting.

  • Parents asked for input on new middle school principal

    Steve Karsner is the new instructional supervisor for Anderson County Schools, filling a vacancy left when Sheila Mitchell was hired as the district’s new superintendent.

    Karsner spent the last three years as principal of Anderson County Middle School, and now the school's site-based decision making council is beginning its search for a new principal.

  • County tax rate goes up

    Homeowners in Anderson County received a 2.5 percent property tax rate increase Tuesday morning after the fiscal court voted to accept what the state terms a “compensating” tax rate.

    Magistrates voted unanimously to increase the tax rate, which is set at the state level and means that the fiscal court will operate on the same amount of revenue it did this past fiscal year.

    Tuesday’s fiscal court meeting also included a round of sparring between a magistrate and the county’s highway foreman, each of whom is running for judge-executive.