.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Bound in black and white, a century of local history

    To understand Lawrenceburg’s future, start with the Kentucky River.
    Bill Bryant, Anderson County native and co-author of the pictorial history volume “Lawrenceburg,” opened to the first page of “Lawrenceburg” and a black and white photo of the river.
    Technically, it’s a rejuvenated spring that fell 300-400 feet from its original location, he says.
    The river is the same water source for the former Cedar Brook Distillery, which operated a water pipeline to the former Cedar Brook pump station.

  • Recycling building troubles leave magistrates stumped

    Just moments after being told by their highway foreman that water and gas lines for a new recycling building were about to be completed, fiscal court magistrates admittedly had more questions than answers about how, or if, that building will actually be built.
    The building, which was to be the centerpiece of the county’s burgeoning recycling program, has become a sore spot for magistrates after bids for it came in at more than twice the $325,000 they voted to spend to have it built.

  • Lawrenceburg man’s home seized in pill mill arrest

    A Lawrenceburg man was charged Monday with prescription drug and money laundering charges, according to an announcement from Attorney General Jack Conway and US Attorney Kerry B. Harvey.
    Ernest William Singleton, who owned a home in Lawrenceburg and a farm in Willisburg, Washington County, was arrested at the Washington County Sheriff’s Office and charged with conspiracy to distribute oxycodone and conspiracy to launder funds from October 2010 until January 2013.

  • County losing thousands in uncollected booze permits

    County government has for years failed to collect thousands of dollars in taxes by not enforcing an ordinance that requires stores selling packaged liquor and beer to purchase a license.
    Retailers that sell malt beverages such as beer are, by ordinance, required to purchase a $140 license each year. Those selling liquor are required to purchase a license for $400. Retailers selling both are required to purchase both.
    A quick count of locations selling packaged beer comes to roughly 25 in and around Lawrenceburg, along with five liquor stores.

  • Passions run high over gun control

    The nation is divided over the hotly contested issue of gun control, and Anderson County is no exception.
    As Americans hold their breath while waiting for the president to reveal his promised measures on gun control later this week, residents here aren’t shy on sharing their views, including one woman who vows no one will take away her firearms.

  • Rash of copper thefts under investigation

    A recent “rash” of copper thefts in the city prompted Police Chief Chris Atkins to ask the city council, and Lawrenceburg citizens as well, to look out for suspicious activity.
    Atkins reported the recent increase of copper thefts in the city during a departmental report at the city council’s Monday meeting.
    “They’re targeting specific items outside of residences and businesses,” Atkins said at the meeting.

  • School system reviews security in response to tragic shooting

    Following the tragic December school shooting in Newtown, Conn., many school districts across the country are beginning 2013 by re-evaluating their schools’ safety procedures.
    Anderson County is no exception.
    School Resource Officer Joe Saunier checked the locked door of a Saffell Street Elementary classroom Tuesday morning during a lockdown, one of several drills being conducted at Anderson County schools that day.  

  • School district settles civil rights lawsuit

    The Anderson County School District has settled a civil rights lawsuit brought by an instructional assistant, according to federal court records.
    The terms have yet to be disclosed, but court records reveal that the district has agreed to a settlement with Kathy Campbell of 1077 Indian Trail Way, Lawrenceburg, who claimed her rights were violated when she lost her job at the end of the 2010-11 school year.

  • Instead of writing a ticket, police officer wins keys to new car

    City Police Officer Michael Corley stood in the pouring rain after he pulled over the driver of a Ford Mustang the Thursday morning before Christmas.
    It was a routine traffic stop, nothing more.
    Little did Corley know that Mustang would become his new Christmas gift.
    “I was pretty clueless until they handed me the keys,” Corley, who recently won a Mustang through the “Battle for Your Mustang” contest, said. “I did not recognize it; I did not recognize the car. I thought it was a legit traffic stop.”

  • City council OKs cheaper water rates to help lure industry

    New jobs plus increased city water use equals economic growth for Lawrenceburg.
    That’s the proposed formula behind a new ordinance unanimously passed by the city council last Friday during a special-called meeting, effective immediately.
    The ordinance, whose purpose is “stimulating the creation of new jobs and commercial development within the community,” authorizes Mayor Edwinna Baker to enter into an agreement offering savings in city water service in exchange for potential job growth.