Local News

  • Edelen, Kemper III vie to replace outgoing state auditor Luallen

    By Jesse Osbourne
    Landmark News Service
    On Nov. 8, two candidates will vie to replace outgoing Kentucky State Auditor Crit Luallen.
    Adam Edelen, the Democratic candidate, and John T. Kemper III, the Republican candidate, will go head-to-head to see who will fill that vacancy.
    Adam Edelen
    At 36, Adam Edelen may be young, but he’s had a lot of experience in both business and government.

  • Conway, P’Pool battle for attorney general’s office

    By Tracy Harris
    Landmark News Service
    Despite advertisements and debates to the contrary, attorney general candidates Jack Conway and Todd P’Pool do have a few things in common.
    Conway, the democratic candidate and current attorney general, will face P’Pool, the republican candidate, on Election Day, Nov. 8.
    Conway, 42, believes his record shows his dedication to the attorney general’s office, a position he has held since 2008.

  • Honor veterans Sunday at Legion

    A Veterans Day celebration sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary will be held Sunday, Nov. 6 at American Legion Post 34.
    The service will begin at 3 p.m. in the Patriot Hall building, and there will be a guest speaker.
    Three area churches will serve a meal to Anderson County veterans and their spouses and guests following the service.
    Interested individuals may RSVP for the meal by calling Pam Rice at 502-680-1268 or Shirley Thornberry at 502-418-6286.

  • Three vie for governor next Tuesday

    James Roberts
    Landmark News Service
    Election Day is next Tuesday, and while there are no local races, voters here will head to the polls from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. to vote for governor among a host of statewide races.
    Three candidates are seeking the governor’s seat, but while each candidate has distinct differences, all agree that the economy and, more importantly, getting Kentuckians back to work, is among the top issues facing the Bluegrass state.

    Steve Beshear

  • Marching into record books

    The Anderson County marching band marched right past last year’s state semi-final ranking, snagging seventh place out of 16 teams at the state contest on Oct. 29.
    The band was a point and a half away from the coveted fourth place spot and a place in the state finals, director Patrick Brady said.
    “For that fourth spot, everyone was battling for it,” he said.

  • Suspected hotel bandit: ‘That’s not me!’

    A Lawrenceburg man suspected in at least four area hotel robberies is proclaiming his innocence from behind bars.
    Bryan Springate, 34, of 1090 Dan Drive was hauled off to jail last Friday on several active bench warrants from Anderson County, but was slapped with four more warrants once he arrived at the Shelby County Detention Center.
    He has been charged in a string of hotel robberies stretching from Louisville to Lexington, during which police say he flooded public bathrooms in hotel lobbies to distract employees.

  • High school marching band qualifies for state semi-finals

    The Anderson County Marching Band qualified for the state semi-finals in Bowling Green after receiving sixth place at the regional marching band contest Oct. 22.
    “We got into it with ease,” director Patrick Brady said via e-mail.
    “We had a pretty bad run by our standards but even with our worst day this year it is better than most people’s best. We scored very well in music something we have been working very hard this year.

  • County receives $55K grant for animal shelter

    Dogs and cats at the county’s animal shelter received an early Christmas present this year — one that will keep them warm this winter and cool next summer.
    Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway announced last Tuesday that the county has received a $55,000 grant from the state’s department of agriculture to make improvements to its animal shelter, including providing heat and air conditioning for animals housed there.

  • City, county get together to talk trash

    The word “mandatory” upsets people, said Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway.
    He doesn’t like it himself.
    “I hate that word mandatory,” Conway said. “I can’t stand it, I wish there was a more favorable word than mandatory.”
    Mandatory trash pickup, however, could lead to Anderson County being designated as a Certified Clean County, a title that would reap grant funds for the county.
    It’s good for the county, Conway said. But he said he’s not sure how to implement it.

  • Hurley keeps job, for now

    Embattled health director Brandon Hurley still has his job, but his fate is far from decided.
    The Anderson County Board of Health took no action following an hour-long closed session last Wednesday night and will no seek “legal advice” on how to proceed.
    Following the meeting, the board announced it will meet Thursday, Nov. 3 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss “personnel.”