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Local News

  • Clerk hopeful says he would donate portion of pay

    A retired Lawrenceburg police officer wants to be the next county clerk and is willing to put a portion of his paycheck where his mouth is.

    Tommy Vaughn, 44, is seeking the Democrat Party's nominee to run this November for county clerk. If he is nominated and wins the position, Vaughn said he would donate to charitable causes about half of the $60,000-plus salary he would receive, pending tax implications.

    "I'm not independently wealthy or anything, but if I could donate part of my pay to help get some projects done that need to be done, I'd be happy to do it," Vaughn said.

  • Animal control officer charged with DUI while on duty

    The county's animal control officer was charged Tuesday afternoon with DUI while on duty at the county animal shelter.

    Darrell Waldridge, 50, of 206 Center St., Lawrenceburg, had a blood alcohol level of .171, nearly twice the legal limit, according to an arrest report obtained from the Anderson County Sheriff's Department.

  • Home sweet home sales

    A drop in home prices coupled with interest rates hovering around 6 percent resulted in home sales here that significantly outpaced sales nationally during the first quarter of 2008.

    Real estate professionals are rejoicing in the latest home sales figures released last week by the Lexington-Bluegrass Association of Realtors, or LBAR, that show sales in Anderson County were up 24 percent from the first quarter of 2007. Nationally, sales were down nearly 23 percent.

  • Interest high for county clerk seat

    Lawrenceburg's rumor mill is in high gear as Republicans and Democrats prepare to name their candidates to fill the late Harold Ritchey's county clerk seat.

    Ritchey, who held the position for about 20 years, collapsed and died earlier this month while jogging on Broadway.

    Edith Hanks, who worked for Ritchey, was chosen by Judge-Executive Steve Cornish to fill Ritchey's position until the November election.

    The chairman of each party said there is no shortage of people interested in the position, which pays in excess of $60,000 a year.

  • Riding for a cure

    A Horseback Poker Run is set for Sunday, June 22, from 1 to 5 p.m. to raise money for Relay for Life.

    The event will be at the Taylorsville Lake horse riding area. Riders pay $5 for a hand, and can pay $1 for one extra card. Half of the proceeds will go to the winner, and the other half will be donated to the American Cancer Society. Those attending are asked to bring a dish for a pot-luck picnic.

    Another event, "Riding for a Cure," will be Friday, July 11, at 6 p.m. at the American Legion Fairgrounds. There will be horseback games, wagon rides and a silent auction.

  • Biker dies on Tyrone Bridge

    A Lawrenceburg man died Sunday after the motorcycle he was driving crashed on the Tyrone Bridge.

    Douglas R. Martin, 30, was driving eastbound on the bridge when he struck the concrete bridge rail just before exiting the bridge on the Woodford County side and was thrown from his motorcycle, according to Kentucky State Police.

    Public Affairs Officer Ronald Turley said Martin was trying to negotiate the turn on the bridge when he lost control.

  • In the family

    A family in Anderson County is keeping up tradition with tobacco farming. Walter and Mary Warford, their son, Mark, and his wife and children all play a role in raising tobacco.

    Mark Warford said his father has raised tobacco for as long as he remembers.

    "I've been raising it since I was 15," he said.

    "We've always done it, that's just the way it is."

    The Warfords farm about 4 acres of land, Mark Warford said. His parents; his sons, Luke and Allen; his daughters, Amanda and Mary Ann; and his wife, Leann, all play a role, he said.

  • Clean-up complete; Legion looks to repairs

    Clean up at Legion Park is almost finished, but the reconstruction has yet to begin, said Terry Rice, Kentucky's public relations director for the American Legion and a Lawrenceburg resident.

    Straight-line winds nearing 50 mph removed what appeared to be a 100-foot section of the grandstand's roof and destroyed Lawrenceburg's Healing Field, the only permanent healing field in the nation, during a storm on June 9. The storm was one of the worst to hit Lawrenceburg in years, according to officials.

  • The show will go on

    The Lawrenceburg Fair and Horse Show will go on as planned despite damages the Legion Park grandstand sustained during Monday night's storm, said Terry Rice, Kentucky's public relations director for the American Legion and a Lawrenceburg resident.

    "At our meeting (Tuesday) night, we even added another class (to the horse show), so it will be bigger and better than ever," Rice said.

  • Trees toppled across town

    What was possibly the largest oak tree in Anderson County was downed during Monday night's storm.

    The tree fell beside the home of Renita and Danny Crouch on Highway 62.

    Tuesday morning, Renita Crouch's aunt, Helen Bowman, was at the home and recounted hearing about the historic tree succumbing to the storm.

    "Renita said Danny looked out the door and said, 'Oh, no, there goes the big oak tree.' " Bowman said. "She called me this morning and said the big oak tree was gone. Renita really thought a lot of that tree."