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Local News

  • Judge gets pay increase; employees get zilch

    If the county budget that was presented at Tuesday night's special fiscal court meeting remains unchanged, county employees' salaries will be frozen for the fiscal year that begins July 1, although Judge-Executive Steve Cornish's pay has already this year been increased by about 6 1/2 percent.

    And if he takes advantage of incentive pay offered to those who take classes designed to make judge-executives more effective in their positions, he stands to earn an additional $2,000 to $3,000.

  • Candidates say economy, education top their priorities

    Both democratic candidates in the race for the 55th district's state representative - which includes Anderson County - place the economy and education among their top concerns

    Current Rep. Milward Dedman, of Harrodsburg, and his opponent Kent Stevens, of Lawrenceburg, both spoke at the April 22 meeting of the Anderson County Democratic Women's Club.

    Each candidate was given nine and half minutes to speak, then the floor was opened up for questions from the women in attendance.

  • Officials say restaurant funds OK to use in parks

    The city of Lawrenceburg can use its portion of a proposed restaurant tax to enhance its parks system, city and tourism officials insisted Monday.

    That stance contradicts statements made last week by a tourism official who said using tourism money that way is improper, a position shared by the president of the Kentucky Restaurant Association, who said cities frequently use the money improperly.

  • Health, safety fair set for Saturday

    A health and safety fair featuring free screenings and children's events is scheduled for Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Anthony D. Stratton Building, located in the county park.

    The annual fair, hosted by the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce with assistance from the Anderson County Health Department, will include a bicycle rodeo and physical activity challenge for children, along with a roll over car simulator.

  • Into the Wild Blue Yonder

    Joshua Yeaste knew what he wanted to do in life before he ever started school.

    "I have always wanted to fly since I was a little boy," Yeaste said.

    The senior at Anderson County High School moved one step closer to that dream when he accepted an appointment to the United States Air Force Academy during a ceremony Friday at the high school.

    "He was 4 years old when he first said that he wanted to fly," Yeaste's mother, Ginger, recalled. "It has just been what he wanted to do."

  • New system warns uninsured drivers to pay

    Anderson County residents whose motor vehicles are not insured will soon have to pay up or have their vehicle registration revoked.

    Starting at the end of this week, about 200 residents will receive notifications by mail informing them that if they don't get proper insurance coverage in 30 days, their vehicle registration will be canceled, said Anderson County Clerk Harold Ritchey.

    After the initial round of letters, notifications will be sent out to new offenders on a monthly basis, Richey said.

  • Meetings today on restaurant tax

    A new tax that would force restaurant owners to charge their customers an additional 3 percent to fund to tourism-related programs will be discussed twice today.

    The Lawrenceburg City Council will consider the idea during a 4 p.m. work session at City Hall. The Anderson County Chamber of Commerce will host a meeting at 7:30 p.m. at Bluegrass Community and Technical College, and has invited restaurant owners to share their thoughts.

  • Gilbert's Creek Road reopens

    Gilbert's Creek Road reopened this morning, 10 days after heavy rain caused a section of it to collapse.

    The announcement was made by Anderson County Fiscal Court Magistrate Jason Denny, who represents residents in that area.

    Denny credited county highway foreman Chip Chambers and his crew for getting the road open as fast as possible.

    "They really worked hard," Denny said. "We thought at first it would take two weeks, but it's done ahead of scheduled."

  • The 'eyes' have it

    Tammy Caldwell isn't sure what attracted her to Humphrey. It certainly wasn't his good looks, and she acknowledges that he doesn't always smell pleasant and at times can be downright cantankerous.

    Maybe it was his eyes.

    "I don't know why, I just wanted a camel," she said. "Once you see a camel, you fall in love with their eyes. He has the longest eyelashes."

  • Proposed use of restaurant tax funds called 'improper'

    Stated plans from local officials on how they would use a proposed 3 percent restaurant tax were called improper Monday by two people who work closely with the tax in other cities.

    The Lawrenceburg City Council is expected to consider the tax - proposed by the Anderson County Tourism Commission - next month. If approved, city and tourism officials say they plan to divide the estimated $320,000 the tax would generate.

    With its share, the tourism commission would hire a director who would double as director of the county's Economic Development Authority.