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Local News

  • Roaches at Saffell, school bus safety cited as reasons to raise school tax

    Student safety and cockroaches at Saffell Street Elementary School were among the reasons supporters and school board members gave for taking the largest property tax increase allowed by law during last Thursday’s public hearing.

    By a vote of 4-1, the board increase its property tax rate from $6.08 per $1,000 in assessed value to $6.27, a 3 percent rate increase that is expected to generate an additional $700,000 from local property taxes.

  • Property taxes going up – way up

    The Anderson County Fire District plans to impose a 38-percent increase on property tax rates when it meets next month.

    The increase, which observers say could be the largest one-year property tax rate increase in county history, would increase the district’s tax rate from 72 cents to $1 per $1,000 assessed value on real estate, meaning a home valued at $100,000 would go from paying $72 per year to $100.

  • School board eyes maximum increase

    The Anderson County Board of Education is expected to take the maximum property tax increase allowed by law when it holds a public hearing Thursday night.

    The board is expected to increase its property tax rate from $6.08 to $6.27 per $1,000 of assessed value, a 3 percent rate increase that will generate 4 percent more revenue than the previous year.

    The additional 19 cents means property taxes on a home valued at $100,000 would increase from $608 to $627.

  • WEED KILLERS

    Police seized an estimated $60,000 worth of marijuana plants last Friday from a location in rural western Anderson County, Sheriff Joe Milam announced.

    Milam said his deputies, along with a trooper with the Kentucky State Police, eradicated 30 plants after receiving a tip from aerial surveillance. The plants, he said, were in a field and that the grower attempted to hide them amid round bales of hay.

  • She’s No. 1!

    Bobbi Jo Lewis is living proof that, with hard work laced with a good dose of courage, dreams can and do come true.

    Lewis was named Kentucky’s County Attorney of the Year during the state prosecutor’s conference last week, an honor she says she used to dream of winning as a young attorney that has now come true.

    “It’s the capstone of my career,” said Lewis, who had no idea Attorney General Andy Beshear had picked her for the award until she arrived at the conference.

  • Burgoo vendors bailing out

    One of the organizers of next month’s annual Burgoo Festival told the Lawrenceburg City Council last week that its decision to make vendors set up on Main Street instead of sidewalks is seriously hurting the event.

    “I’m pleading with you,” said organizer Larry Simpson. “I’ve worked hard for three years, and I’m losing every vendor I get in here.”

    The city council ordered vendors off the sidewalks two years ago after Main Street merchants complained that they were blocking entrances to their businesses.

  • A ‘once-in-a-lifetime event’

    Carolyn Penny had no intention of joining her fellow seniors in staring at the eclipse of the sun Monday afternoon at the Anderson Senior Center.

    “When I look up into the sky, what I want to see is the face of God,” Penny said, dismissing offers to look at the eclipse through special lenses.

    Her refusals didn’t last long, though, once the light began to fade and others oohed and aahed at seeing the moon nearly eclipse the sun.

  • ‘We will miss him terribly

    An Anderson County Sheriff’s deputy died Sunday night following a lengthy illness.

    Donnie Lee Sutherland, 70, died at his residence, according to obituary information posted at the website for Gash Memorial Chapel.

    Sutherland was a longtime deputy and previously worked as a police officer with the Lawrenceburg Police Department.

    Funeral services will be 1 p.m. Thursday at First Baptist Church, with Bro. Fred Knickerbocker and Bro. Garrett Franklin officiating. Burial will follow in Lawrenceburg Cemetery.

  • Anderson class of 1967 plans 50th reunion

    While the rest of America in 1967 was embroiled in everything from the war in Vietnam to the Summer of Love, Anderson High School seniors had other, less pressing things on their minds.

    “We had the Fairgrounds Drive-In,” said Peggy Robinson-Dixon, as she and her classmates shared memories while preparing for their upcoming 50th class reunion next month at Wild Turkey Trace golf course.

    “That was our hangout.”

  • Did your road make the grade?

    Without a word of debate or dissent, the Anderson County Fiscal Court last Tuesday unanimously approved this year’s road paving list at a cost of nearly $750,000.

    Previous versions of the fiscal court bickered endlessly over which roads were to be paved. Magistrates lobbied hard for roads in their own districts, particularly 6th District Magistrate Kenny Barnett, who oversees by far the most miles of sparsely populated county highways in Anderson County.