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Local News

  • Back to school a financial hit to parents

    As the new school year approaches, many students are groaning because the long summer days of freedom are quickly diminishing, while their parents are groaning for another reason.

    “’I’ve been dreading this trip,” Amy Gill said candidly while she shopped for school supplies with her children at Lawrenceburg Walmart. “It’s expensive and it seems like every year they add something new to the list. The whole thing can be frustrating.”

  • County fire department purchases new tanker

    The Anderson County Fire Department is updating its fleet to better to serve the citizens of Anderson County, said Fire Chief Patrick Krogman. The fire department recently received its newest addition to the fleet, Tanker 3.

    The fire chief said the department was in need of new vehicles and Tanker 3 was replacing a model from the 1980s.

    “Average use is about 20 years and we try to keep our vehicles for as long as we can,” said Krogman. “We just really needed a new one.”

  • Big tomatoes, bigger heart

    The tomato plant snaking its way up a column on Jimmie Hawkins’ front porch on Chautauqua Street would have likely kept growing had it not run into the rain gutter.

    “I measured it. It’s 10 feet tall,” Hawkins said Monday morning as he gazed at what he figures is one of the tallest tomato plants he’s grown. “It would have kept going if it didn’t run into the gutter.”

  • Charges continue to pile up on man charged with hitting pregnant woman with hammer

    A Lawrenceburg man who turned himself in for an outstanding warrant last week ended up going back to jail for a host of other charges he apparently didn’t know even existed.

    Brent Wayne Campbell, 41, of 1131 Salt River Road was wanted on a warrant related to charges from earlier this year that included hitting a pregnant woman in the forehead with a hammer and smashing her hand in a door.

  • Filling the air with love songs

    Love songs will fill the air this weekend in Lawrenceburg, although not the kind normally found on the FM radio dial.

    These love songs will be played Aug. 1 and 2 during the Native Dawn Flute Gathering, scheduled from sunup to sundown both days at the Lawrenceburg Green.

    Admission is free.

    Fred Nez Keams, a full-blooded Navajo who has lived in Lawrenceburg for about eight years, founded the event with his wife about five years ago, and it has grown by leaps and bounds since.

  • WWII vet recalls events that shaped his life

    oe Gay said he cannot complain about the past 92 years he has spent on this earth.

    “I’ve been blessed all my life,” he confesses. “You know what they say about the youngest child in a family. Everyone takes care of the baby. I’ve been spoiled.”

    That is not to say that everything has been easy, but Gay said through the grace of God he has always ended up in the right place at the right time.

  • In Alton, the wrecks just keep coming

    Speed traps? Check.

    Angry residents? Check.

    Another car ending up in Brian Flood’s front yard on Graefenburg Road in Alton? Check.

    Despite efforts to slow traffic and calls from Alton residents to make improvements to Graefenburg Road, a woman’s car veered off the narrow state highway early Sunday morning, sheered off a phone pole and landed upside down in Flood’s front yard.

    Carol Miller of Simpsonville sustained minor injuries in the wreck and was transported to Frankfort Regional Medical Center via Anderson County EMS.

  • Giving Main Street another chance

    Life is slowly coming to downtown Lawrenceburg. Anyone who takes a stroll down the sidewalks on Main Street can see the fresh paint on the old buildings, new signs in the windows and construction crews, plumbers and electricians working long hours to bring new businesses to fruition.

    When asked why the resurgence, many new business owners say they were inspired by the sudden spike in bourbon’s popularity and, as the Bourbon Trail continues to attract thousands of visitors to local distilleries, they say they hope to offer out-of-towners a taste of Lawrenceburg.

  • Soda pop, ’Stangs and half-court shots

    With their metallic emerald green paint, creamy white leather seats and convertible tops, it is hard to imagine that the1990 Limited Edition 5.0L LX convertible Mustangs were once considered failures.

    Way back in the early 1990s, the 7-Up bottling company and Ford agreed on an unusual marketing idea: to give away 30 dark green 5.0L LX Mustang convertibles at the 1990 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball finals.

  • Library board approves $4 million expansion

    This time they mean it.

    After several votes in recent years to consider expanding the Anderson Public Library were put on hold due to a pending lawsuit, uncertainty and, at times, public unrest, the library’s board of trustees on Wednesday approved a plan that will cost an estimated $4 million.

    Afterward, library officials made it clear that this time, the project will move forward.