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Local News

  • Walking ‘The Walk’

    In its first year, ‘Senior Walk’ brings the soon-to-be high school graduates, in their caps and gowns, back to their home elementary school to celebrate their graduation with the youngsters. The former Saffell students danced in the halls and slapped high fives with the current Saffell students. Elementary students held signs and cards, and waved pom-poms for the class of 2016. For more on this year’s senior class, see our annual graduation section inside.

  • Naked woman in vehicle leads to drug bust

    Having a naked woman in your car while it’s parked on Ballard Street will draw the attention of the police.

    Having suspected drugs in your car at the same time will land you behind bars.

    That was the case Monday for a Lawrenceburg man who was charged with trafficking heroin and other related drug charges.

  • Audit: Fiscal court paid to train non-county employee

    A state audit of the Anderson County Fiscal Court shows numerous problems, including how the county controls its credit cards and its purchases.

    Released last week by state Auditor Mike Harmon, the audit focuses on the county’s finances during the 2013-2014 fiscal year and includes a litany of issues related to segregation of duties.

  • Safety study begins on 151

    After months of demands followed up by a lawsuit, Alton residents are finally getting what they’ve asked for all along: a safety study of Highway 151.

    News of the study surfaced following a meeting last week between representatives of Group 151, which filed the lawsuit, and transportation cabinet officials in an effort to settle the suit outside of court.

  • Dare Graduation festivities

    Fifth-graders from around Anderson County participated in DARE graduation at Anderson County High School last Friday. Country singer J.D. Shelburne spoke, sang a few songs and signed a lot of autographs.

  • Firefighters rescue cow stuck in pond

    Anderson County firefighters were able to rescue a cow this afternoon that became stuck in a small pond on Hammond Road.

    The cow was apparently trying to stay clear of an eager bull when it was either knocked into the muddy water or went in while trying to get away, the owner told rescuers.

  • Naked woman in car leads to drug bust on Ballard

     

    Having a naked woman in your car while it’s parked on Ballard Street will draw the attention of the police.

    Having suspected drugs in your car at the same time will land you behind bars.

    That was the case Monday for a Lawrenceburg man who was charged with trafficking heroin and other related drug charges.

  • Burst water line floods clerk's office

     

    Employees at the Anderson County Clerk’s Office got a wet welcome when they arrived to work Monday morning to find over an inch of water in a portion of the building and heavy damage to the building’s basement.

    Clerk Jason Denny said some portions of the upstairs — including his office — had an inch or more of water on the floor due to a busted water line.

    Denny said none of the office’s paper records were damaged.

  • Woman gets DUI after being clocked at 107 mph

    A woman who police say was three times the legal limit while driving more than 100 mph on U.S. 127 allegedly threatened to kill a state trooper after he pulled her over.

    Joyce A. Bailey, 39, of 114 Chautauqua St. told the trooper, “I will have my father cut out your (expletive) heart and feed it to the hogs,” according to a criminal citation filed by trooper Tim Mullins, before adding “I will get out of jail and go back to Wyoming and you all will never see me again.”

  • Schools ‘blindsided’ by transgender demands

    An edict from the Obama administration that requires public schools to allow transgender students to use the bathrooms, locker rooms and showers of their choice or risk lawsuits and the loss of federal funds has left school officials here looking for answers and seeking legal advice.

    The mandates were issued last Friday by the U.S. Department of Justice and Department of Education, catching educators across Kentucky off guard and scrambling to figure out how, or if, they should comply.