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Local News

  • Students injured when bus hits suspected drunk driver’s vehicle

    A Lawrenceburg man faces DUI charges after the vehicle he was driving collided with an Anderson County school bus this afternoon, sending two elementary students to an area hospital.

    The students complained of head and neck pain and were transported for precautionary reasons, first responders said.

    The man, identified by police as Billy Cecil of 1141 Versailles Road, Lot 25, was allegedly more than three times the legal limit when the bus backed into his vehicle at the corner of Canterbury Street and Dickens Drive.

  • Meth, heroin, pills land four behind bars

    From staff reports

    Four people are behind bars after being charged during the past week with possession of a controlled substance, including three charged with possessing heroin or methamphetamine.

    Ashley Mitchell, 25, of 100 Robbie Drive, Lawrenceburg was charged with first-degree heroin possession and other charges when the vehicle she was driving was stopped Aug. 2 on Grant Drive.

    In his citation, officer Clay Crouch of the Lawrenceburg Police Department said he pulled her over because a passenger in the car was not was not wearing a seat belt.

  • Woman jailed when ‘three-way’ goes awry

    From staff reports

    A Lawrenceburg woman remains behind bars after telling police that a “three-way went bad” July 31 at a residence on Lakeview Drive.

    Courtney D. Chesser, 23, of 1072 Butler Drive, is charged with fourth-degree assault, second-degree disorderly conduct and alcohol intoxication in a public place following the incident early that morning, according to a police report filed in Anderson Circuit Court.

  • City’s value falls again

    The overall value of city of Lawrenceburg dipped for the sixth consecutive year while outside of the city, the county’s overall value showed a healthy increase.

    Lawrenceburg’s value fell from last year’s assessment of $530,167,902 to 529,886,650, roughly a $1.2 million decline.

    Since 2010, the city’s overall assessment has dipped nearly $13 million, and it is anticipated that the declines will continue in years to come.

    City Administrator Robbie Hume there are several overall factors for the overall decline.

  • From Alton Station to Grand Ole Opry

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. — If the definition of a great country song is “three chords and the truth,” David Wayne Johnson might have found his niche.

    The Anderson County native has toiled for 10 years trying to make it in the country music business, playing between 250 and 300 shows a year in bars and clubs across the country. All the while, he’s been searching for that right combination of Hall of Famer Harlan Howard’s description of what makes Music City magic.

    He keeps things simple with three chords and the truth.

  • Talks break down between state, 151 Group

    Talks between residents of Highway 151 and the state’s Transportation Cabinet have broken off, likely sending to trial the group’s demand to ban commercial trucks on the treacherous state highway, according to one of the group’s spokesmen.

    The 151 Group, led by residents Tom Isaac and Don McCormick, filed a lawsuit earlier this year to permanently ban commercial vehicles other than local delivery after decades of wrecks they say were caused by unsafe conditions on the road that serves as a shortcut between U.S. 127 and I-64.

  • Smith wins crown, scholarships

    Amy Kate Smith ran away with most of the scholarships and the title of 2017 Distinguished Young Woman of Anderson County Saturday night at the Anderson County High School auditorium.

    “This is something I dreamed about since I was a little girl,” she said, moments after 2016 Distinguished Young Woman Brooklyn Carpenter placed the medallion over her head. “My mom is a past winner and this is something I’ve always wanted to do.”

  • City Council finalizes tax rate for coming year; meets two new officers

    Undaunted by its continuously shrinking property tax base (see related story, A1), the Lawrenceburg City Council on Monday unanimously approved keeping its property and other tax rates flat for the coming year.

    The rate remains at $1.95 per $1,000 in assessed value, meaning a home assessed at $100,000 will pay $195 in city property taxes.

    The council also unanimously approved a resolution to borrow just under $2 million to upgrade the sewer system in Alton with the expectation that half of that cost would be borne through a Community Block Development Grant.

  • Fiscal court holds line on tax rate

    The Anderson County Fiscal Court on Tuesday voted to hold its property tax rate flat for the coming year.

    The decision keeps the rate property owners pay at $1.30 for every $1,000 of assessed value, meaning the county’s portion of a tax bill on a home assessed at $100,000 would be $130.

    The rate was suggested by Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton, who said the budget that just went into effect was built on keeping the tax rate the same.

  • Fiscal court holds line on tax rate

    The Anderson County Fiscal Court on Tuesday voted to hold its property tax rate flat for the coming year.

    The decision keeps the rate property owners pay at $1.30 for every $1,000 of assessed value, meaning the county’s portion of a tax bill on a home assessed at $100,000 would be $130.

    The rate was suggested by Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton, who said the budget that just went into effect was built on keeping the tax rate the same.