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Today's News

  • Fiscal court appoints new tourism board members

    Anderson County Fiscal Court appointed new members to the Anderson County Tourism Commission Tuesday of last week.

    Fiscal court appointed Brad Barfield of Hunter’s Grill, Pam Brough, president of the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce, Stewart Gritton, who has a long history of working on fair boards, Todd Hyatt of the Lawrenceburg Best Western, Megan Hoskins of the Lawrenceburg Best Western, Nicki Bryant of the Wild Turkey distillery and George Leamon, executive director of the Lawrenceburg-Anderson County Economic Development Authority.

  • New sign ordinances are designed to be explicit, user friendly

    The city, county and Anderson County Chamber of Commerce worked together to draft new sign ordinances designed to be more explicit and easier to follow.

    The sign ordinance draft was presented at an Anderson County Fiscal Court meeting Tuesday of last week.

    The new proposed sign ordinances outline each sign and gives a glossary of definitions for popular signage from an abandoned sign to a window sign.

  • Is the T.B. Ripy mansion haunted?

    Jeff Waldridge, paranormal investigator and owner of the Lawrenceburg Ghost Walk, says benevolent spirits attached to the house, possibly even Thomas B. Ripy himself, haunts the Ripya mansion.

    Waldridge, a lifelong Lawrenceburg resident, has been working on the Lawrenceburg Ghost Walk for about 3 years, compiling research through microfilm at the Anderson Public Library, Kentucky Historical Society documents and The Anderson News clippings from the 1900s.

    The end product fuses history with the paranormal to give tourists a memorable experience.

  • Affordable Care Act has not replaced the need for the free clinic

    Kim Brown is not one to look a gift horse in the mouth.

    A couple of years ago, the 57-year-old diabetic was between a rock and a hard place. She needed frequent blood tests to get medication but couldn’t afford the tests that cost around $1,500 per month.

    Her health had deteriorated to the point that she was in constant pain.

    While reading The Anderson News one day, she found information about what would become her salvation - the Anderson County Community Medical Clinic, a free service to qualifying patients.

  • News writers are recognized by Society of Professional Journalists

    The Anderson News Sports Editor John Herndon and former News Editor Meaghan Downs were recently honored for the their work by the Society of Professional Journalists, Louisville Chapter.

    Downs was awarded first place in the Best News Story category with her story “Terror, then anger!” The story about a local robbery that appeared in the July 31, 2013 edition of The Anderson News.

  • Springate is appointed to fill empty district judge seat

    Betty Springate of Lawrenceburg was appointed to Division I district court judge for the 53rd District court, serving Anderson, Shelby and Spencer counties, Monday of last week.

    Springate’s appointment marks the first time in 30 years a district court judge has resided in Anderson County.

    “It’s an honor to serve Anderson, Shelby and Spencer Counties,” said Springate. “It’s an honor for Anderson County, for even a short period of time, to have their own judge.”

  • No one was injured in Fairview Road fire

    The Anderson County Fire Department responded to a structural fire in the 1700 block of Fairview Road around 8:45 a.m. Tuesday of last week.

    The fire caused extensive damage to the structure and all of the occupant Don Keeling’s belongings. Several Anderson County firefighters were checked by EMS for dehydration and heat exhaustion. None of the firefighters required transport to the hospital.

  • Lawrenceburg takes center stage in upcoming indie film

    It’s short and low budget but “The Sentinel Chronicles: After Exodus-12 Days In the BQZ” will create exposure for Lawrenceburg and Anderson County that could attract fans of the series and future film makers.

    At an estimated run time of 9 minutes and a budget of $20,000, 12 Days joins a growing list of films that have shot scenes in Anderson County.

    The Sentinel Chronicles is an Atlanta, Ga.-based sci-fi Web series. At 7 years old, it is the oldest, ongoing sci-fi Web series in that state.

  • Primary Care closing leaves Medicaid patients ‘high and dry’

    More than 10,000 patients must seek treatment elsewhere

    By Shelley Spillman

    News Editor

    Anderson Primary Care officially closed its doors Friday.

    The clinic’s more than 10,000 registered patients will be directed to Paragon Family Practice in Versailles.

    Anderson Primary Care, owned by Lu Anne Wallace and Ann Giles, was one of the only medical care facilities that took Medicaid, leaving many Medicaid patients with no place to seek treatment locally.

  • Mitchell’s contract is renewed

    Anderson County Schools Superintendent Sheila Mitchell’s contract was renewed during a special-called meeting Thursday of last week.

    The 4-year contract outlines Mitchell to make $118,225 annually, which is a 12 percent increase from when she started in 2010, making $105,000 annually. Under the contract, consisting of 240 working days, Mitchell has five days of paid leave for each school year.