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Today's News

  • Students using math to fight cancer

    Saffell Street Elementary School is busy working math problems in the hopes to help fight childhood cancer.

    The school’s Math-A-Thon fundraiser, which helps to raise money for St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, has been a tradition for over 14 years and is something students and educators look forward to.

  • Woman charged with beating grandson, 7

    A Lawrenceburg woman is free on $10,000 bail after being charged with abusing her 7-year-old grandson, according to documents on file in Anderson District Court.

    Elsie Franklin, 61, of 1001 Cox Lane was charged March 14 with first-degree criminal abuse of a child under the age of 12, court documents say.

    According to an arrest warrant filed by deputy Zach Ray of the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office, Franklin is accused of “intentionally abusing” her 7-year-old grandson, causing him physical injury.

  • ‘He went there to try to save her’

    The North Carolina man charged with beating and slashing a 15-year-old girl earlier this month following an argument that started over Facebook apparently wasn’t the only one who had a knife when the altercation began.

    During a probable cause hearing last Thursday in Anderson District Court, the police officer who arrested Ryan Smith, 18, testified that Smith told him afterward that the 15-year-old had a butcher knife at the time.

  • Study claims Highway 151 safer than most

    Highway 151 apparently isn’t so dangerous after all.

    A safety study conducted by the state’s Transportation Cabinet in response to a lawsuit filed against it last year concludes that the narrow stretch of state highway is statistically safer than the norm.

    “Overall statistical analysis of all-vehicle-type crashes shows that KY 151 is experiencing lower crash rates and lower severity of crashes than Kentucky roadways of similar functional classification,” according to the report, which is posted on the cabinet’s website.

  • No bail reduction for suspects in Harrodsburg Road shooting

    A judge denied bail reduction requests last Thursday for two of the men charged in a Harrodsburg Road vehicle chase that included gunfire.

    Michael Rice, 27, and Shelby Waford, 32, appeared before District Court Judge J.R. RoBards, who declined to reduce their bail, entered pleas of not guilty and waived their charges to a grand jury, which will decide whether to indict each on eight counts of wanton endangerment and, for Waford, possession of a handgun by a convicted felon.

  • Trial set for man charged with trying to murder police officer

    A trial is scheduled to begin Monday for the Danville man charged with attempting to murder officer Clay Crouch of the Lawrenceburg Police Department.

    John Tompkins, who was 35 at the time of his arrest, will stand trial for attempting murder, first-degree assault, fleeing police, felon in possession of a handgun and a rash of drug-related charges.

  • Girl, 15, beaten, slashed over Facebook spat

    A 15-year-old Lawrenceburg girl was beaten and slashed several times with a steak knife by a man who became angry when she looked at an ex-boyfriend’s Facebook page, according to police reports.

    Ryan L. Smith, 18, of Fayetteville, North Carolina was charged with first-degree unlawful imprisonment and second-degree assault in the March 8 incident that occurred on Djeddah Drive.

    Smith and the juvenile were in what police called a “sexual relationship” after meeting on the social media website.

  • Dead recycling building to be county morgue

    Having already killed the reason for which it was built, the Anderson County Fiscal Court has decided to turn a portion of its recycling building into a morgue.

    Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton confirmed the decision last week, saying work will begin soon to configure a portion of the building into a morgue.

    “We are going to section off about 16 feet in one of the bay areas, all the way to the back wall,” Gritton said. “It already has working water, an eyewash station and a drain.”

  • ‘He was a banjo man’

     

    It’s only fitting that Greg Breeding’s friends told him goodbye by playing bluegrass music during his funeral service last week at Ritchie & Peach Funeral Home.

    Breeding, who gained a considerable following playing banjo with a host of bluegrass bands since the mid-1970s, passed away March 4 following an illness.

    He was 62.

    “He was a banjo man,” said fellow musician and Lawrenceburg resident Marty Harley, who met Breeding in the late 1970s and spent the past two decades playing music with him.

  • She’s the boss

    Taylor Cook might be a 16-year-old junior at Anderson County High School, but that didn’t stop her from opening her own business.

    With help from the Future Farmers Association (FFA), she was inspired to open Taylor Belle’s after completing a supervised agricultural experience project about two years ago. Taylor Belle’s is a licensed and insured mobile ice cream trailer that serves hand dipped ice cream cones at local events.