.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • ACHS students attend choral clinic at Morehead

    50 YEARS AGO

    Thursday, Oct. 7, 1965

    Bowen nominated

    County Attorney Ollie J. Bowen was nominated as president-elect of the Kentucky State Bar Association

    Summoned for duty

    Summoned for jury duty in Federal Court Wednesday were Melwood Stevens of Lawrenceburg, and Earl Burgin of Gee.

    Eye surgery

    Clinton Sparrow returned to his home from the St. Joseph Hospital in Louisville where he underwent two eye operations. He was recovering satisfactorily.

  • HOSPITAL, SCHOOL, THRIVING BUSINESSES IN TYRONE

    The following is from Wyatt Shely’s ‘Our Heritage’ column that appeared in Jan. 6, 1966 issue of The Anderson News.

    Even before the Village of Tyrone was incorporated (1879) the people of that community manifested a keen interest in education.

    Though the inhabitants of the valley, now Tyrone, were very few prior to 1850, one of our first schools was on the road leading to Subletts (Shryock’s) ferry.

  • County highway workers to spray chemicals, or else

    No county highway employees volunteered to spray chemicals for weed control, so the Anderson County Fiscal Court voted last Tuesday to make them do it anyway.

    Saying that refusal to do so would constitute “insubordination,” Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton recommended and the fiscal court agreed that all highway employees be formally trained to apply the chemicals and equipped to use them.

  • Fiscal court OKs another deputy for coroner

    A tag-team approach lead by the county attorney finally convinced the Anderson County Fiscal Court to fulfill Coroner Dr. Mark Tussey’s request to hire an additional deputy coroner.

    Magistrates approved the hiring during their meeting last Tuesday morning that included an impassioned plea from an unlikely source, County Attorney Bobbi Jo Lewis.

    During the work session before meeting, Lewis told magistrates of a recent incident during which her office was asked to be involved in a death notification.

  • TV star no match for ‘Lawrenceburger’

    KET television star Tim Farmer became the latest victim of the Lawrenceburger Challenge on Sunday afternoon, as he and two other men tried in vain to consume the giant burger, slaw and fries offered at Lane’s Diner in Lawrenceburg.

    Farmer was in town to film an episode for his popular series, Tim Farmer’s Country Kitchen, and took the challenge in front of a boisterous crowd.

  • County Fire District hosts annual awards banquet
  • Does God bless Christians who sin? Of course he does

    By Nancy Kennedy, Faith Columnist

    One of the Internet blogs I follow, “The Stretch Marks Blog,” is written by a woman in Texas, Melissa Lee.

    She’s beyond hilarious, loves big hair, “The Bachelor,” her crazy family, chocolate and Jesus.

    She writes mostly about superficial stuff, but not really. There’s a depth to her faith that shines through even her weekly “The Bachelor” recaps.

  • These projects need your support

    By Jane Sinnett, Guest Columnist

    A new year, a new beginning, another chance to make our mark, do our best and be of service to that great cause that is so near and dear to our hearts.

    So how can we pick one cause from the many that tug on our consciousness almost on a daily basis? Just ask yourself how you can truly help and where your contribution be used.

  • Cooking teaches children valuable life skills

    I remember the first food I cooked, chocolate drop cookies. I was 7 years old. I remember making cookies, cake, fudge and tuna noodle casseroles.

    Anyone else remember wacky cakes? In seventh grade I started cooking dinner a few times a week to help my mother.

    From my cooking experiences as a child, I learned skills that stayed with me for life.

    I think I have become a better cook since the day of the garlic disaster. There is a significant difference between a garlic clove and a garlic bulb. I’ll never forget that experience.

  • Keep firewood insects out of your home

    Every time you bring a load of firewood inside this winter, you may be opening the door for wood-infesting insects to make your home their home.

    Most insects brought into the home on firewood are harmless, but you can greatly reduce their numbers by following a few simple steps.

    When stacking wood outside, avoid stacking it directly on the ground. This will keep it from getting too wet and reduce the chances of infestation by such insects as termites and ants.