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Today's News

  • Ninevah Christian pays off expansion early

    The massive, $2.25 million expansion at Ninevah Christian Church was supposed to take 20 years to pay off.

    On Aug. 1, the church paid off the loan, in full, and is now considering what comes next.

    “We are not finished, we’re just getting started,” said Pastor Terry Cooper in an address last Sunday to his congregation. “We will continue to preach the gospel in this place called Ninevah.”

  • Highway 151 residents fume after judge tosses lawsuit

    Those hoping a Franklin County judge would ban large commercial vehicles off of Alton Road will need to keep hoping.

    Judge Phillip Shepherd last week dismissed a lawsuit filed to ban such trucks from Highway 151 in Alton, saying in his order that 151 Group, as it’s known in the lawsuit, failed to “exhaust administrative remedies” through the state’s transportation cabinet and that his court lacks jurisdiction to hear the case.

  • Questioning motives on changing rules for public notices

    Column as I see ’em …

    State lawmakers are working their tails off this year on a super-important issue.

    Just ask them.

    No, it’s not solving the state retirement boondoggle they are solely responsible for creating. Instead, they’re bent on doing all they can to operate with as little transparency as possible and couching it behind a lie that doing so will save you money.

    What a surprise, eh?

  • Here are best ways to treat lawns for ants

    Several species of ants are common landscape residents. They nest in places that meet their needs: suitable soil type and drainage, convenient food sources, and in some cases, sheltering rocks or logs.

    We most commonly share greenspace with field ants, pavement ants and larger yellow ants. Mounds of soil excavated by ants make turf bumpy and smother grass around the openings.

  • Pass survival skills down to children

    You could say I got my start on this day, 90 years ago. History shapes us all, whether we realize it or not. Those who know me, know that I’ve never met a stranger, am fairly athletic and love to share stories with humor. In my much younger days I danced, a lot. I got all those traits from my father, Jack.

  • ‘Hopestock’ coming to Lawrenceburg Green

    By Brittany Fuller

    News staff

    Anderson County HEROES (Helping Educate Reaching Out Ending Stigma) is planning a new event to bring hope and recovery to struggling addicts and their families in Anderson County.

  • Humane Society, candle maker team up for fundraiser

    The Anderson County Humane Society has partnered with the Candleberry Company for a new campaign next month called “Flip this Kennel.”

    In hopes to raise money for kennel repairs, the Humane Society will hold a Candleberry sale at the Legion Hall on Sept. 9 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. If they do not sell out they will also hold the sale open from 1-4 p.m. on Sept. 10.

  • Advancements in DNA laid before state Judiciary panel

    FRANKFORT—Laura Sudkamp with the Kentucky State Police crime lab remembers when it took months to process one DNA sample.

    “You literally had to stick the film in the freezer for six to eight weeks,” the KSP Central Lab manager told the Interim Joint Committee on Judiciary last week, according to a news release. Her lab can now generate a profile on a DNA sample in one or two days, she said, but even that’s a bit longer than need be under some new technology.

  • Homemakers Craft, Garden Show winners announced

    From staff reports

    The following are winners in their categories at the Annual Homemakers Craft and Garden Show held last month at the extension office at the Anderson County Community Park:

    Antiques Department

    Wood collection: Marvin Smith

    Cloth collection: Betty Parrott

    Metal/Tin collection: Evelyn Smith

    Glass collection: Joan Beard

    Jewelry collection: Judy Collins

    Miscellaneous collection: Betty Parrott, Dixie Willing

    Wood individual item: Betty Parrott, Brenda Gritton, Bobby Gritton

  • Summer Camp with a twist comes to Heritage Hall

    A different spin on summer camp happened this year at Heritage Hall when employees were allowed to bring their children to work with them in order to spend time with the elders in the community while also cutting down on daycare expenses.

    Starting in a Signature Home community in Tennessee, the program has now branched out to all Signature Homes across the United States.