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Today's News

  • 10-22 Jail log

    The following people were arrested and transported to jail, according to Anderson County Jailer Joani Clark.

    Oct. 12

    Claudia Varela for no operator’s license, no registration plates, no registration plates and no insurance by the Kentucky State Police.

     

    Oct. 15

    Charles Foley for Franklin County warrant by the Lawrenceburg Police Department.

     

    Oct.16

  • Montgomery wins at Kentucky State 4-H Shooting Sports Competition
  • Band takes Reserve Champion

    From staff reports

    The Anderson County High School Marching Bearcats took the Reserve Grand Championship trophy at the Butler Traditional Invitational Band Contest held Saturday.

    Anderson won the Class 4A division in the preliminaries, but finished second overall to Louisville Male in the finals. Anderson had a distinguished score of 84.35, while Male, a class 5A school, finished at 84.90.

  • Police conduct compliance checks on sex offenders

    By Ben Carlson

    News staff

    Registered sex offenders in Anderson County got the once-over earlier this month by local, state and federal law enforcement to ensure they are obeying the rules.

    Of 32 people checked in Anderson County, no arrests were made in a sweep dubbed “Operation Whiskey River,” which included checks made here along with Mercer, Scott and Woodford counties. One sex offender remains under investigation as the result of the check, but charges have not been filed, according to Anderson County Sheriff Troy Young.

  • Friends of Library plan Halloween book sale

    From staff reports

    Want your costumed child to receive more than candy this Halloween?

    Children dressed in costumes will receive a free children’s book during the Friends of the Anderson Public Library’s annual Halloween sale, scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 25 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at in the back lawn of the library, located at 114 North Main St., Lawrenceburg, according to a news release.

  • Keep pesticides safely stored this winter

    Generally, manufacturers recommend a two-year storage period for pesticides. However, storage times vary with active ingredient, formulation, type of container, and storage conditions.

    Get the most out of carry-over products by carefully reading the storage and disposal section of each label for pesticides that you store over the winter.

    Proper pesticide storage

    Proper pesticide storage keeps people safe and preserves your investment. Buy carefully to avoid having large volumes of products to store from one season to another.

  • Venison is tasty fresh, canned or dried

    Venison adds variety to meals. When properly handled in the field and at home, it’s tasty and less expensive than other meats.

    It can be eaten fresh or preserved for use throughout the year. It can be frozen as steaks, roasts or sausage or preserved by canning or drying.

  • When misinformation leads to mistrust

    As Americans, we often rely on the expertise of others to make an informed decision. If you have cancer, you visit an oncologist to give you variety of options on how to treat the disease. If you car isn’t running properly, you take it to a mechanic. If you have chronic soreness and stiffness, people often visit a chiropractor. With the same logic, we trust the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be experts in the spread of contagions and limiting the spread of contagious diseases such as Ebola.

  • Nightmare brewing for local Democrats?

    By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …

    If the interviews I’ve conducted over the past couple of weeks are any indication, Thursday’s candidate forum at the middle school has the potential to be informative and entertaining.

  • Water lines, fire hydrants called into question

    When a water main broke in front of his South Main Street last week, Ed Ruggles said it was just one example of many infrastructure concerns to which the city has turned a blind eye.

    The break allowed water to flow into his lawn, down his driveway run into his garage. Although Ruggles said nothing in his garage was damaged, he did say it was the inconvenience of having to take everything out and hose it down.