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Today's News

  • Man charged with burglary after stealing $2 in change

    A Lawrenceburg man remained behind bars Monday for allegedly stealing $2 from a residence on Avenstoke Road, according to court documents.

    Jacob C. Browning, 25, of 1366 Buntain School Road, was arrested last Thursday on a charge of second-degree burglary and ordered held on $10,000 cash bail.

    According to a warrant for his arrest, Browning kicked in the back door of the Avenstoke Road residence and stole approximately $2 in change from a box in the home’s master bedroom.

  • Woman faces meth, heroin charge

    A Lawrenceburg woman remained jailed Monday on drug charges and for resisting arrest, according to documents on file in Anderson District Court.

    Brianna Mowry, 21, of 203 Franklin St. was around 4 a.m. Saturday when deputy Zach Ray of the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office attempted to serve a warrant for her arrest on Hunter Ridge Drive.

    In his report, Ray said he and officer Trey Burris of the Lawrenceburg Police Department were forced to use “empty hand techniques” to subdue Mowry, who put up a fight as Ray attempted to place her in handcuffs.

  • Cops catch suspect following foot chase

    A Lawrenceburg man was charged Sunday afternoon after leading police on a foot-chase that began on Northwood Loop and ended on Johns Way.

    Billy Joe May, 27, of 1099 Northwood Loop was charged with first-degree fleeing or evading police, fourth-degree assault (domestic violence) and possession of marijuana after officers with the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office and Lawrenceburg Police Department were able to track him down.

  • Science, art a winning combination for fifth grader

    Julia Fugua, a fifth-grader at the Christian Academy of Lawrenceburg, takes time every year to combine science and art as she enters the school’s art contest. Fugua is the recent winner of the 2016 Kentucky Conservation Art Contest for Area 6.

    “I enter because I like to learn something new every year. It is important for me to learn things and to know how to help keep our earth clean,” said Fugua. “To learn about our natural resources and learn how we can protect them, and how they can help us.”

  • Mayor proclaims ‘Equal Pay Day’ for women
  • How to prevent soft-bodied slugs from ruining your plants this spring

    Slugs are among the first creatures to become active in spring. They scrape their mouthparts across leaves, stems and flowers to ingest plant tissue. Shade gardens are ideal habitats for slugs, along with mulched areas containing bedding plants. New transplants and small seedlings are especially vulnerable to these creatures. Feeding damage and silvery slime trails are already apparent on bedding plants.

  • Time to get spring veggies in the ground

    Talk about some gorgeous days! The longer light and warm temperatures sure have made for some productive days on the farm. I’ve noticed several newly plowed garden plots around the county, so I know I’m not alone in ratcheting up our outdoor activity level.

    While I was out playing, I noticed numerous times when a teeny, tiny little tick was crawling on my hands. These things are smaller than a pin head and they can crawl into lots of places. You don’t even feel them crawling on you because they are so light.

  • A wall of Trump’s own making

    I’ve hit a wall of my own making.

    I started jogging before Christmas, and though I could not complete even 1 mile without walking some, I decided to sign up for my first half marathon on April 1.

    With zero experience running long distances and not bothering to research training regimens, I figured three months would be plenty of time to get to 13 miles. I would work hard. I was committed. Piece of proverbial cake.

  • Live in Taylorsville? I don’t think so

    Taylorsville is a neat little community, but I sure wouldn’t want to live there.

    Here’s why: A front page story in last week’s edition of The Spencer Magnet chronicled how a teenager housesitting for friends cowered in a bathroom after hearing someone breaking into the house. The teen called 911 but, because law enforcement in Spencer County is a full-blown Dumpster fire these days, the first officers to arrive were troopers who traveled there from Anderson County.

  • Fiscal court approves employee pay increase

    County employees, including sheriff’s deputies, EMS workers and deputy coroners, are celebrating their first pay increases in years.

    The Anderson County Fiscal Court last Tuesday unanimously approved a 3 percent pay increase for all county employees, along with a pay adjustment for EMS workers who were among the lowest paid in the region.