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Today's News

  • ‘God saved us’

    With his 8-month-old grandson in his arms, Lawrenceburg resident Tommy Wise was forced to hunker down beside his car as portions of a daycare center’s roof blew past him last Thursday evening.

    “I no sooner picked him up out of his car seat when the sheet metal started coming off the roof,” Wise said. “I was scared to death. I had no idea what was going on.

    “All I could do was duck down. It happened in a blink of an eye.”

  • Fireworks planned for July 4

    A fireworks display and other events are scheduled for Saturday, July 4.

    Sponsored by city and county government, the display will be shown at the county park at dusk.

    A rain date is scheduled for Saturday, July 11 at the same time and location.

    At 5:30 p.m., the annual Veterans Parade sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary is scheduled to begin at Legion Park and end at the Lawrenceburg Green.

    Lineup for the parade is scheduled for 4:30 at the Legion.

  • Feeding Pharoah

    Frank Tinsley was feeding an eventual Triple Crown winner and didn’t even know it.

    He does now and is mighty proud of the fact that food created at Anderson County Farm Service fed the mighty American Pharoah for nearly a year.

    “Someone said we should hang a banner on the front of the building,” Tinsely said last week. “I’m definitely proud but don’t really like to toot my own horn.”

  • Plants, flowers hidden dangers to pets

    Buds burst forth, plants bloom in rainbows of color, the air is cool and refreshing. But don’t be fooled. There are hidden dangers in our yards and gardens, not only for our sensitivities, but for Kitty and Fido.

    Pet owners know that dogs and cats can often find the strangest things to chew on. Whether it be plastic, wool or plants in the house or the garden, it can be at odds with your pet’s health. Here’s a list of some of the most common plants to be concerned with.

  • New care standards for diabetes

    Diabetes affects over 29 million Americans. It is a condition in which the body does not properly process food for use as energy.

    Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, which our bodies use for energy.

    The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of the body. When you have diabetes, the body either doesn’t make enough insulin or the cells can’t effectively use the insulin that is made. When there is insufficient insulin, blood glucose levels become high.

  • Garlic, onions make potent bug repellant

    It’s officially summer. I don’t even need a calendar because I can spot that blue chicory and those orange lilies along the sides of the road, my personal harbingers. Evening skies glow with lightening bugs flashing gold like dust motes in the sunshine. Just driving to work, through the winding green canopy, is a treasure for the eyes. Man, I love this season.

  • Odorous house ants do more than stink

    Odorous house ants (OHA) are difficult to control. Unfortunately, they are becoming more common in samples sent to the Insect Identification Lab. These small (1/8-inch) dark ants form distinct trails along outdoor and indoor surfaces.

    Description and nesting sites

  • City’s shield laid to rest

    One of the most common symbols of law enforcement is the police badge, or shield.

    It is quite possibly the most important piece of an officer’s uniform, the object not only identifies the wearer as a member of law enforcement it also serves as a reminder of their oaths to protect and serve their community.

  • A budget deficit that never was

    The fiscal court’s decision last Tuesday not to borrow $400,000 to balance its budget laid to rest any doubt that there ever was a budget deficit.

    Did the previous fiscal court burn off a large amount of cash putting together a recycling program that was ultimately doomed to fail? Sure it did; no one is questioning that.

    What I am questioning is why there was ever discussion of a deficit in the first place.

  • An old-school message to modern times

    Tommy Bowden is a football coach. At least that’s how he’s known to the masses.

    And even though he’s been away from the sidelines for more than six years, that success he had at Tulane and Clemson give Bowden an avenue to share his first love.

    Bowden, who also spent a year as Bill Curry’s first offensive coordinator at the University of Kentucky, was in town over the weekend, speaking at Hope Community Church Sunday morning.

    He was using a platform given by his enormous gridiron success to talk about his deep Christian faith.