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Today's News

  • Unhappy plants? Give them a new home

    I pass by a lot of yards every day. I love to look at the variety. Some are well manicured and designed for ease of mowing and maintenance. Some are filled with arbors, benches and pots. Some have multiple shades of green and some offer a riot of color.

    Your yard says a lot about you. It tells how much time you spend working to keep things beautiful. Mine is a mix of what I like to call tamed and untamed cattle fields.

  • Clearance shopping will help you save

    Another question I get asked a lot is, “How do you get clothes for so cheap?” My answer, “I shop for clearance items!” I always shop the clearance rack before I even think about shopping for full price items.

    This past week was a rough week for me. But like most women, the best way to turn a frown upside down is to shop.

  • The Dept. of Education and our identity crisis
  • The dark side of black root rot

    Recent rainy weather in Kentucky has favored black root rot disease development. Black root rot can affect a wide range of ornamentals in home and commercial landscapes, nurseries, and greenhouses.

    Black root rot is commonly observed on Japanese and blue hollies, inkberry, pansy, petunia, and vinca. In addition to ornamentals, numerous vegetable and agronomic crops are susceptible.

    Black root fot facts

  • Little Miss Perfect

    By Ben Carlson

    News staff

    Madison Powell isn’t perfect, but she’s pretty darn close.

    The 18-year-old senior at Anderson County High School was recognized recently for having perfect school attendance for 12 consecutive years, a rare feat that has only been accomplished one other time during the past decade or so.

    Powell says a variety of factors went into her not missing school from her first day in first grade through the day she graduates later this month, not the least of which is guilt.

  • Experts say prepare now for Zika

    Take precautions but don’t be alarmed.

    That is the advice from local officials who are developing pre-emptive plans to deal with a potential if unlikely outbreak of the Zika virus.

    The mosquito-born virus, which poses serious concerns for pregnant women but produces only mild, flu-like symptoms in others, has officials here and statewide preaching caution that is centered primarily on property owners taking precautions about standing water.

  • Bearcats rally, take advantage of Clark miscues

    Anderson County took advantage of three George Rogers Clark miscues in the bottom of the seventh to score twice and defeat the visiting Cardinals, 4-3, in high school baseball action Saturday afternoon.

    Given GRC’s 20-10 record, it might have been Anderson’s most impressive victory of the year.

  • Bearcats rally, take advantage of Clark miscues

    Anderson County took advantage of three George Rogers Clark miscues in the bottom of the seventh to score twice and defeat the visiting Cardinals, 4-3, in high school baseball action Saturday afternoon.

    Given GRC’s 20-10 record, it might have been Anderson’s most impressive victory of the year.

  • Restroom directive could greatly impact sports

    I wonder what would happen if sometime during the spring, a thoroughbred horse owner concluded that his prized 3-year-old colt really identified as a filly.

    Could he petition to let his horse run in the Kentucky Oaks or the Black-Eyed-Susans Stakes? Or if he wanted to still run in the Triple Crown races, would he get a 5-pound weight allowance?

    Absurd? Of course, it is.

    But it’s no more absurd than the directive out of Washington last week that could greatly affect sports as we know them.

  • Two Bearcats qualify for state meet

    LEXINGTON – For several weeks, the track team at Anderson County High School might have resembled a M*A*S*H unit or a sick bay. Or both.

    Friday night, two of those who were not at full strength still had enough to place second in their best events in the Class AAA, Region 6 meet at Tates Creek High School. Connor Duncan, in 300-meter hurdles, and Alorra Sims, in both the long jump and triple jump, automatically qualified for the state meet, scheduled for Saturday, May 28 at the University of Kentucky.