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Today's News

  • Bearcat fans had plenty to cheer about in 2007-08

    Growing up, I was an avid Cat fan...well, a UK Wildcat fan, that is. You see, in the years just before the current Bearcat athletes were born, I was a Mercer County Lady Scottie, and I would dare say that back then, I would never think of cheering for the Anderson Bearcats.

    In life, however, change is inevitable. The Scotties do not even exist anymore, but more importantly, seven years ago, I was hired as an English teacher at Anderson County High School.

  • Interest high for county clerk seat

    Lawrenceburg's rumor mill is in high gear as Republicans and Democrats prepare to name their candidates to fill the late Harold Ritchey's county clerk seat.

    Ritchey, who held the position for about 20 years, collapsed and died earlier this month while jogging on Broadway.

    Edith Hanks, who worked for Ritchey, was chosen by Judge-Executive Steve Cornish to fill Ritchey's position until the November election.

    The chairman of each party said there is no shortage of people interested in the position, which pays in excess of $60,000 a year.

  • Riding for a cure

    A Horseback Poker Run is set for Sunday, June 22, from 1 to 5 p.m. to raise money for Relay for Life.

    The event will be at the Taylorsville Lake horse riding area. Riders pay $5 for a hand, and can pay $1 for one extra card. Half of the proceeds will go to the winner, and the other half will be donated to the American Cancer Society. Those attending are asked to bring a dish for a pot-luck picnic.

    Another event, "Riding for a Cure," will be Friday, July 11, at 6 p.m. at the American Legion Fairgrounds. There will be horseback games, wagon rides and a silent auction.

  • Cats roll past Meade in summer action

    The calendar and thermometer both said June but Anderson County basketball was going strong last Thursday as the Bearcats routed visiting Meade County 71-52 in a summer league game.

    While Anderson coach Glen Drury keeps not statistics during off-season play, it was easy to see that the Bearcats were playing very well against a team that won 20 games last year. But the game also underscored that summer league games are not the same as the varsity action in late February and March.

    "Their coach told me that they were missing one of their better players," Drury said.

  • More than a historian

    On those occasions when W.J. Smith shared just a bit of his knowledge of Anderson County history, I learned about Ducky Holmes, Rhoda Kavanaugh, Paul McBrayer or the Lawrenceburg A's. I came to know at least a bit about anyone else that had been a part of the local sports scene.

    I learned about a swallowed tongue. Seven overtimes. And how sports teams at Anderson County High School became known as the Bearcats.

    Most of all, W.J. Smith reminded me time and again that sports, even when taken very seriously, are about fun.

  • Seeding, pinching and trimming after the rain

    Well, we're on our way to getting our average 3 1/2 inches of rain in June. I only hope the rest of it comes without the wind damage. The rain did save my crops and I know I wasn't alone. The long, dry spells do have their benefits. We can plant more.

    Now is the time to start seeds for the fall garden. Pumpkins, cabbage and cale crops can be planted from seed to give you more food for the pantry this winter. It's also time to pinch back mums, coleus and impatiens. If that's not enough to keep you off the streets, I've got more.

  • Biker dies on Tyrone Bridge

    A Lawrenceburg man died Sunday after the motorcycle he was driving crashed on the Tyrone Bridge.

    Douglas R. Martin, 30, was driving eastbound on the bridge when he struck the concrete bridge rail just before exiting the bridge on the Woodford County side and was thrown from his motorcycle, according to Kentucky State Police.

    Public Affairs Officer Ronald Turley said Martin was trying to negotiate the turn on the bridge when he lost control.

  • The cicada dance - a trend that needs to die out

    I don't think I've ever wanted a group of living things to die so much in my life.

    OK, so that's a little harsh, but I can't stand those darn cicadas.

    I don't like bugs at all, really. Bees and wasps are my biggest fear and I'm not even allergic to them. I'm trying to make sure we take special precautions (even if it means paying extra) to make sure no guests of the insect variety show up at my outdoor wedding. I know it's outside so it will be pretty impossible to keep them all away, but I tell myself they won't show up because they're not invited.

  • Text messages bring down the quality of conversation

    I think I recently contracted a case of acute text message syndrome. My fingers ache, I ignore my surroundings to finish a message and I will have whole conversations without actually speaking.

    Alright, you probably know this isn't a real disease. But it might as well be an epidemic sweeping America. People complain about teenagers texting all the time, but I actually received a text from my mother the other day.

  • In the family

    A family in Anderson County is keeping up tradition with tobacco farming. Walter and Mary Warford, their son, Mark, and his wife and children all play a role in raising tobacco.

    Mark Warford said his father has raised tobacco for as long as he remembers.

    "I've been raising it since I was 15," he said.

    "We've always done it, that's just the way it is."

    The Warfords farm about 4 acres of land, Mark Warford said. His parents; his sons, Luke and Allen; his daughters, Amanda and Mary Ann; and his wife, Leann, all play a role, he said.