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Today's News

  • Disability or different ability? Every life is precious

    When a militant neo-atheist like Richard Dawkins spouts off one of his many Darwinian talking points, I rarely give any consideration to what has been said.

    His rhetoric is vitriolic, fueled by a hatred of religion, especially of Christianity. But when someone with over a million Twitter followers says something as acrimonious as a baby diagnosed with Down syndrome should not be allowed to be born, it causes me to sit up and take notice.

  • Deadly highway claims another life

    By Shelley Spillman

    News Editor

    Another fatal crash on U.S. 62 claimed the life of Courtney Meyers of Holland, Ohio, on Thursday, Aug. 14.

    Myers, who Kentucky State Police confirmed was a passenger the gnarled blue Dodge Dart, was involved in the collision at the intersection of Hunter Ridge Drive and U.S. 62. She died from her injuries at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington. She was only 20 years old.

    Myers is one of four who died in crashes on the same stretch of U.S. 62 since 2011.

  • Accidental career bears a lifetime of memories

    It started out with Jim Sayre growing out his beard after completing active duty in the Army in 1959 and grew to be a rewarding career impersonating America’s 16th president, Abraham Lincoln.

    He chronicles memories, travels and people he encountered during his 31-year career in his book “Memories of the Great Pretender.”

    “A lot of people always said he looks like Lincoln,” said his wife, Mary Sayre.

  • City ponders costly stormwater compliance

    The Lawrenceburg City Council sought out information to discuss the next steps necessary to be in compliance with state-mandated stormwater runoff regulations Monday of last week.

    CDP Engineers Inc., an engineering firm based out of Lexington, has been guiding the city through the process. It presented information on the steps the city has already taken and the steps it will be expected take in the near future.

  • LPD: ‘Drive sober or get pulled over’

    If you drink and drive in Anderson County beware, the Lawrenceburg Police Department has joined forces with law enforcement throuhgout the nation for the “Drive sober or get pulled over” campaign Aug. 13-Sept. 1.

    The strong nationwide impaired driving crackdown will include high-visibility enforcement, high-profile events and will be supported by national paid advertising, creating a comprehensive campaign to curb alcohol impaired driving in August through the Labor Day holiday.

  • Adult Learning Center offers sign language class

    The Anderson County Adult Learning Center will be hosting the American Sign Language I class.

    The course is designed for adults over 16 who have little or no knowledge of sign language, according to a news release.

    Arlene J. Hoffman, certified ASL instructor, is the teacher for this class. Students will learn the manual alphabet, ASL vocabulary, numbers, colors, games and more.

    After taking this class, students should be successful at communicating with the deaf and hard of hearing. Students should bring lined paper or notepad and a pencil or pen.

  • State employees return local resident to Personnel Board

    The Kentucky Personnel Board recently conducted an election to fill two seats for state merit employees.

    The other five members are appointed by the governor. Ballots were sent to approximately 26,000 state employees, and included 23 candidates with the top two elected to the Personnel Board.

    Larry Gillis, of Lawrenceburg, finished first in the balloting and will return to the Personnel Board for the next four years.

  • Wheeler Quarter Horse Association Queen of 1984

    Compiled by Janie Bowen

    jbowen@theandersonnews.com

    There were some questions about names in the photo that ran June 18 of the Civil War veterans. The photo was taken about 100 years ago in front of the old Anderson County Courthouse.

    One of the names questioned was Tolle or Toll.

  • First day of school
  • Depression can be treated successfully

    Robin Williams was an amazingly talented actor and comedian. He was a devoted philanthropist who dedicated time, talent and funds to help individuals and groups enjoy a better quality of life. Williams also suffered from depression. He died August 11, an apparent suicide.

    About six million men in the United States experience a depressive disorder. About 65 percent of the men with depression will go undiagnosed and without treatment. About 97 percent of those reporting depression also report that their work, home life and relationships suffer as a result of depression.