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Today's News

  • Mixed emotions

    A bittersweet aura floated through the crowd during the American Legion Auxiliary’s Healing Field and Veterans Day Ceremony on Sunday afternoon.

    Those in attendance seemed saddened to have to raise 11 new flags at the Healing Field, but triumphant to have a place to honor the state’s fallen heroes — especially since its grounds were flattened during a storm five months ago.

  • LEBANON – Football coaches, perhaps more than any other sort, like to discuss just how much their sport mirrors life.

    The successful ones preach positive thinking over and over. Not the kind of pie-in-the-sky dreaming some mistakenly equate with the attitude, but the real-life nuts-and-bolts attitude that drives so many successful people in all occupations.

    Work hard, and good things will happen.

    A real team can accomplish much more than individuals.

    All roles, no matter how small, are important.

  • Western Hills routs Bearcats

    UPDATED Friday, Nov. 7, 11:25 p.m.

    Western Hills ruined Anderson County's Senior Night with a 32-13 romp past the uninspired Bearcats Friday night.

    “We didn't show up,” said Anderson coach Mark Peach. “I am embarrassed.”

    Western Hills repeatedly made the plays it needed to while Anderson dropped passes -- “Too many to count,” Peach said – missed tackles and stopped promising drives with penalties.

  • Never giving up

    One of the biggest perks of this job is getting to know people like J. C. Briscoe.

    It’s when you meet winners like this sophomore at Anderson County High School that you realize, again, that championships are not always the ultimate prize.

    To be sure, it is easy to get caught up in the excitement a big trophy can bring. Anderson County basketball fans sold over 5,000 tickets when the Bearcats last made the state tournament.

  • How low will it go?

    Six weeks ago locals flocked to neighborhood gas stations to fill up on $4-a-gallon gasoline before it rose to a rumored $5-a-gallon.

    That was then.

    Last week people hustled back to fill up for a much more appealing reason — to take advantage of gasoline prices that were falling at a record pace.

  • An explanation for an unhappy reader

    A very pleasant but obviously unhappy lady called me Friday to object to the number of harvested deer and other wildlife photos that appeared in last week’s paper.

    She is a long-time subscriber but made it clear that if dead animal photos continue to be printed, she most certainly will not renew her subscription again.

    To slugs like me who sell newspapers, that’s like hearing nails on a chalkboard.

  • A political name game

    Political campaigning that unmercifully seemed to go on forever finally concluded Tuesday. The mudslinging from both parties was brutal. But modern-era campaign shenanigans pale in comparison to the political hi-jinks perpetrated by some shirttail relatives of a Lawrenceburg man who, in 1912, came very close to being elected president of the United States.

  • Judge denies lone student’s appeal to vote

    Lara Wheeler didn’t vote in yesterday’s election, but it wasn’t for a lack of trying.

    Wheeler was one of the 21 current and former students who attempted to register to vote through Anderson County High School, but whose registration cards were turned into the county clerk’s office four days too late.

    However, Wheeler was the only one from the group who decided to appeal the decision of the county’s board of elections in Anderson Circuit Court.

    Judge Charles Hickman sat on the bench to hear Wheeler’s appeal.

  • Better slow down

    The state’s transportation cabinet lowered the speed limit on U.S. 127 Bypass to 45 mph in front of the new elementary school, and drivers are just now finding out.

    Over the past week, multiple drivers have been pulled over, thinking that the limit jumped to 55 mph when they passed the park entrance heading north, and dropped at the same location when heading south.

  • Parents learning the joys of ‘No. 2’

    I never thought I could be so excited about someone going No. 2 — yes, that No. 2.

    But when it’s a dog and the act is happening outside instead of in your kitchen floor, living room or car, it’s darn near worth shouting about.

    Josh and I welcomed Lily, our 32-pound bouncing, baby yellow lab, into our home last week. She’s 5 months old, and for the next few years, she’s the closest thing to a baby we’re going to have. But as I’m finding out, having a dog is a lot closer to having a baby that one might think.