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Today's News

  • Even a beauty queen needs a diploma

    Test scores have been on the minds of a lot of folks as of late, especially those with children in public schools.

    Most media attention tends to focus on the local schools' progress in meeting academic goals so that the schools can be compared with ones in neighboring communities, or so one state's progress can be matched against another state's.

    Not nearly as much ink is spent on student dropout rates. Perhaps it should be. While Kentucky has made progress, it continues to have one of the nation's highest dropout rates.

  • Industrial Foundation disbands, gives $1.2 million to economic development authority

    The local Industrial Foundation recently voted to disband and turned over $1.2 million to the Joint Lawrenceburg/Anderson County Economic Development Authority, Judge-Executive Steve Cornish announced at Tuesday's Anderson County Fiscal Court meeting.

    "They asked that two of their former board members be added to the Joint Authority," Cornish said.

    The court voted unanimously to approve the agreement and appointed former Lawrenceburg Mayor Bob Thompson to fill one of the two additional seats on the Joint Authority.

  • Introducing The Lineup

    A new feature on The Anderson News sports page this week is simply called "The Lineup." Found on Page B2, The Lineup lists as many scores, statistics and standings as possible from the wide myriad of sports happenings in Anderson County in a single glance. The Lineup includes youth soccer scores and goes all the way through college sports scores of teams that include Anderson County residents.

    We expect The Lineup to be ever changing and hope you will submit your scores, stats or brief highlights to be included on this page.

  • Locals flock to pumps, fearing higher prices

    Jeremy Coates spent $100 filling up his truck Friday afternoon, and that was considered a good deal.

    With rumors that gas prices might reach $5 per gallon last weekend, a friend told Coates he should fill up soon or literally pay the price.

    And Coates certainly was not alone.

    Kathy Case, who was working the cash register at the BP on U.S. 127, said the gas station had seen a definite increase in business during the lunch hour Friday.

    "The pumps have been full for an hour and a half," Case said.

    But Five Star on Broadway could even top that.

  • These Lady Bearcats are good!

    LEXINGTON - They won't say it publicly, but there have to be times when those closest to the girls' soccer program must want to just scream, "Hey, we are good!"

    But Saturday night, they would have just been talking to themselves.

    Finding a more appropriate sports venue than Jon Akers Stadium at Lexington's Dunbar High School to serve as the backdrop for the 21st-ranked Lady Bearcats Saturday night would not be impossible, but it would be close.

    Kind of like finding dollar gas these days.

  • Second half explosion lifts Bearcats in district opener

    Jacob Russell and Grant Cox connected on a 37-yard touchdown pass on Anderson County's first play of the game, but it was a second half explosion that lifted the Bearcats to a 58-21 win over visiting Grant County Friday night.

    Russell, who completed 14 of 18 passes for 247 yards, teamed up with Cox for two more first half scores, then arced a throw over the Grant defense to Dustin Combs on Anderson's first series of the second half that put the Bearcats up 37-21 and started the second half blitz.

  • Locals flock to pumps fearing higher gas prices

    Jeremy Coates spent $100 filling up his truck Friday afternoon, and that was considered a good deal.

    With rumors of gas topping $5 per gallon in Lexington and Louisville on Friday morning, a friend told Coates he should fill up soon or literally pay the price.

    And Coates certainly was not alone.

    Kathy Case, who was working the cash register at the BP on U.S. 127, said the gas station had seen a definite increase in business during the lunch hour Friday.

    "The pumps have been full for an hour and a half," Case said.

  • Go get 'em, mayor

    The right to private property is a great thing ... heck, an American thing.

    But no matter how much property a person owns, it's still stitched to someone else's and we are all accountable to each other to take care of what we own.

    A story in this week's paper serves as a microcosm of how one person's reluctance to maintain his property affects those around him. His back yard is replete with junked vehicles, piles of scrap lumber and other items that are an eyesore.

    His front yard isn't much better.

  • County issues burn ban

    A ban on outdoor burning was issued Sept. 3 for all of Anderson County.

    "That means no burning at all," warned Anderson County Fire Chief Mike Barnes, who made the announcement after the decree was approved by Anderson County Judge-Executive Steve Cornish.

    Barnes said the ongoing lack of rain prompted the ban, along with a number of small grass fires that have flared up over the past couple of weeks.

  • Back yard brawl

    When family members wanted to have a wedding in Shelby Phillips' back yard, they took one look at her neighbor's yard and said "no way."

    The property behind Phillips' Ballard Street home is a tangle of overgrown weeds, piles of scrap lumber, junked vehicles and other debris that she says poses a health hazard and is driving down adjacent property values.

    "We all keep our yards nice and neat," said Phillips. "But this is horrible. It ruins everybody's back yard."