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Today's News

  • Bus policy puts pinch on parents

    Transportation issues dominated the conversation at the first of three informational meetings about the new Anderson County attendance areas Monday night.

    A majority of the 25 to 30 parents at the Saffell Street Elementary School meeting weren't there to criticize the new attendance area plan, but to question the effect the plan would have on transporting their children to after school care.

  • Bill stumps for Hillary Tuesday in Frankfort

    Thousands jammed into the Frankfort Convention Center on Tuesday morning, filling it to capacity. They came to listen to former President Bill Clinton explain why Kentuckians should support his wife Hillary in her run for the presidency.

    "First, I'd like to thank Kentuckians for voting for me twice," said Clinton, who carried the state both times he was elected president.

    "The economy has been made worse and worse by the policies of the current administration," he added. "The middle class is being squeezed dry."

  • Third-grader dies days after stroke

    Gabe Adkins, an 8-year-old student at Robert B. Turner Elementary School, died March 19 following a massive stroke March 10, said Lynne Gritton, Turner's school counselor.

    Gabe was a son of Monica and P.J. Matney of Lawrenceburg, and Phillip Ray Adkins of Mount Sterling. He was in Lori Wells' third-grade class.

    "He had been sick for four or five days before March 10," Gritton said. "But we don't really know what with."

  • Racin' with the Casons

    On March 15, I participated in the second annual Shamrock Shuffle, a 3K race through the streets of downtown Lexington. Moving at my normal turtle-like pace, I had my best race ever.

    As a youngster, I wasn't into distance running. I got into jogging later in life in an attempt to keep my weight down and stay physically fit. But I've never been a serious runner.

  • Here's a cure for summertime blues

    Now that spring has sprung (Easter's snow flurries not withstanding), it won't be long before children are released from school bondage and freed to roam Anderson County in search of fun.

    Some, whose parents fork over 50-plus bucks, will wile away their summer hitting and throwing baseballs and softballs in the county park. Others will give soccer moms another season to exist.

  • Who will be Anderson's next Junior Miss?

    One of the area's most popular events returns to the Anderson County Middle School auditorium stage April 12 when 21 girls vie for the title of Anderson County Junior Miss.

    The winner will be eligible to compete in January for the 2009 Kentucky Junior Miss title.

    The event, now in its 27th year, focuses on academics and provides scholarship money for the winner. That focus is what makes it so popular, organizer Sherry Hall said Tuesday morning.

  • The numbers don't lie

    There really is an "I" in team.

    At least in track and field there is.

    "It's not like football or basketball. Track is an individual sport," says Anderson County head coach Travis Gay. "If you improve, you have been successful. You do not have to win every time you step out there."

    The key factor, as far as Gay is concerned, is for the individual to be able to say, "I have improved."

    "We try to make it fun for the kids and have them compete with themselves," Gay says. "If you do that, you can be successful even if you don't win."

  • Small ball could add up to big things

    If Anderson County is to achieve big things in 2008, the Lady Bearcat softball team will have to do it playing small ball.

    According to head coach Brian Glass, it looks to be a year where scores of 1-0 and 2-1 will be the norm. If you are looking for results that look more like football scores, you might as well wait until the fall.

  • Shelby's Sweet 16 run should motivate basketball Bearcats

    There had to be times when the collective knot in Anderson County's stomach might have been incurable during last week's state basketball tournament.

    Nothing against Shelby County. The Bearcats' chief rival proved during the Eighth Region Tournament that those who had written Shelby off because of some puzzling mid-season losses were quite mistaken. Down 5 inside the last half-minute of the regional championship game, Shelby showed the heart of a champion by coming back to win against Gallatin County.

  • Murder suspect pleads not guilty

    The Lawrenceburg man charged with fatally stabbing a Franklin County man outside the Lawrenceburg Food Court on Jan. 16 waived formal arraignment and pleaded not guilty Tuesday morning in Anderson County Circuit Court.

    Frederick C. Graeter, 18, is charged with first-degree murder for allegedly stabbing Robert Snider, 20, to death. First-degree murder is a Class A felony punishable by 20 years to life in prison. Graeter is also charged with tampering with evidence.

    According to court testimony, Graeter allegedly attempted to purchase marijuana from Snider.