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Today's News

  • Prayers sought for ailing fiscal court magistrate

    The Anderson County Fiscal Court paused during last Tuesday’s meeting to ask for prayers for an ailing magistrate.

    Juretta Wells, the court’s longest-tenured magistrate who represents the county’s 4th District, had complications arise from a medical recent medical procedure and was recouparating at Cardinal Hill in Lexington.

    “Everyone please keep her in their prayers,” said County Clerk Jason Denny, who once served as a magistrate with Wells.

  • ‘Moonshiners’ star to unveil signature whiskey here Friday

    By Ben Carlson

    News staff

    Chico was in standard form Saturday morning when he pulled into the parking lot in a battered Montel Carlo with “Hazzard Life” emblazoned across one front quarter panel and a make-shift air scoop riveted to the hood — a redneck-mobile if there ever was one.

    A half-hour late for a media appearance to promote his new whiskey, he jumped out, complained about how one of his tires locked up en route from his home in Gravel Switch to Lawrenceburg, and about his missing pit bull.

  • Library to close Sunday for month

    From staff reports

    The Anderson Public Library will close its doors Aug. 28 to move into its temporary location as a large-scale expansion project begins.

    It is scheduled to reopen Sept. 26 at 1030 B Industry Road.

    The move is to accommodate the library’s $4 million expansion plan to its Main Street facility, with construction expected to last approximately one year.

  • Yes, there really are some bad ideas

    Saving the old Glensboro schoolhouse is something I would love to see happen, but not if it’s going to be done foolishly.

    That’s about the only way to describe an idea that was apparently the motivation for the fiscal court and school board to recently delay for 30 days the likelihood that the crumbling structure in front of the high school is doomed.

  • Now is time to prepare for winter

    Well, the rains have stopped. At least for several days. Just in time for cool nights and open windows. Now, if I can just get my carburetor adjusted on the tractor, I’ll only be in slightly high clover.

    Only two more Saturdays left at the produce stand and all I can think about is summer coming to a close. Soon, the weather won’t be nearly as favorable for outdoor chores. Now is the time to start preparing for that “opposite” season. I don’t even like to use the word.

  • Learning to live with bumble bees

    Bumble bees are social insects that nest in protected places: belowground in abandoned burrows of small mammals, in birdhouses, stuffing in abandoned furniture, or under piles of grass or rags in sheds or barns.

    They visit flowers to collect pollen to feed their larvae and nectar that provides them with energy.

    Do not disturb

  • Searching for great deals? Look no further than your phone

    Hello, everyone. I know it’s been a little while, but life has a way of throwing curveballs. So I am back at it and saving even more money.

    Did you know there are several different apps you can download and save more money? I know a lot of you are reading this from your phone, so why not just download some apps and save some more money?

  • School board to decide on tax rate

    By Ben Carlson

    News staff

    Although no formal decision on a tax rate has been made, the Anderson County School Board will consider a maximum increase in its tax rate when it meets Aug. 31, according to a legal notice issued in last week’s paper.

    If the board opts to increase its revenue a full 4 percent, the rate property owners pay would increase 3.75 percent, going from $5.86 per $1,000 in assessed value to $6.08.

    The meeting is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. at the district office on U.S. 127 near Emma B. Ward Elementary School.

  • Honor Flight set for WWII veteran

    On Aug. 27, 94-year-old Earnest “Pete” Cox will do something he’s never done before — fly in an airplane.

    That airplane, which will depart around 6 a.m. from Blue Grass Airport in Lexington, will carry Cox and 51 other World War II veterans to the nation’s capital for a day of sightseeing and camaraderie.

    “There’ll be quite a few vets there,” Cox’s daughter, Donna Franklin, who will be accompanying him on the adventure, said. “They told us to ‘be prepared and bring tissues.’”

  • Driver safety urged around school buses

    “Distracted driving is our number one problem,” Jeff Young, director of transportation for Anderson County Schools, said.

    He said a lot of drivers don’t stop for school buses. “It’s been a problem for years, but it seems like it’s getting worse,” he added.

    Young said most of these incidents occur on the main thoroughfares. “On the smaller roads it’s not a problem because the bus takes up enough of the road that motorists must pay attention,” Young explained.