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Today's News

  • Father, son charged after argument turns physical

    A Lawrenceburg father and son face fourth-degree assault charges after they got into a fight on Hamlin Way, according to court records.

    Mark Teegarden, 49, of 1117 Lewis St., and Marcus Teegarden, 19, of 1526 Fieldstone Way, Apt. 20 were charged after a verbal argument turned physical, according to a police report.

    Officers with the Lawrenceburg Police Department were dispatched after a report of a fight in progress. Officers reported that each man agreed that they grabbed each other at the same time and started “wrestling around.”

  • Pre-game meals a piece of cake

    School lunches might not give student-athletes enough to eat to get through practices, but games are a different story.

    “Games are a lot easier than getting something to eat before practice,” Anderson County High School athletic director Rick Sallee said. “The school does not provide the meals. It’s usually some parents that do that.”

    Sometimes, the pre-game meal is the responsibility of the player’s family. For others, the teams have organized meals. It depends on the sport and the locale of the competition.

  • Imagining our city with nine more bars

    By Ben Carlson

    Column as I see ’em …

    Here’s something I’ll bet you didn’t know.

    Were there enough interest, Lawrenceburg could have nine more bars.

    Yes, you read that correctly. Little old Lawrenceburg, which less than 10 years ago didn’t even allow liquor by the drink, has that many retail drink liquor licenses available should anyone choose to open that many places to drink it.

  • Developers ready for LIFT

    By Hal Goode

    Guest columnist

    Recently, the Kentucky House of Representatives took a big step forward in allowing local communities more control over their own growth and economic development. With overwhelming bipartisan support, the House passed LIFT, or Local Investments for Transformation.  This a bill allowing Kentuckians to decide for themselves if they want to allow local voters to invest in economic development and infrastructure projects in their communities.

  • And the drumbeat for war goes on

    To the editor:

    Warmongers in Congress learned nothing from the well-taught lessons of Vietnam. Remedial lessons were repeated in the Middle East, and they flunked them.

    Erase their failures to learn and ISIS would be one less problem in the world.

    Consequential samplings related to their failures include: Muammar Gaddafi, Libra, shot to death; Saddam Hussein, Iraq, death by hanging; Hosni Mubarak, Egypt, forced resignation.

  • Bidding good riddance to February

    Hello, March, I am so glad to see you.

    February is in the record books and I fervently hope those records stand for a long, long time. I want to open the door in the morning and walk outside to stand in shorts and a T-shirt.

    March is filled with ups and downs when it comes to the weather, but hopefully we’ll see the mercury rising in leaps and bounds. March begins with the Full Worm Moon Thursday and Daylight Savings time Sunday.

  • Tips to care for sundowner syndrome

    If you care for someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease you may notice that they get increasingly agitated, anxious, more confused or aggressive as the sun begins to set.

    These symptoms may be associated with sundowner syndrome, which causes people to be confused at the end of the day and into the night. It is common for individuals who are sundowning to pace, wander, ignore directions and not sleep well.

  • Development is key to improving reproductive efficiency in heifers

    To improve the reproductive efficiency, and thus profitability, of a beef cattle operation, you must understand proper heifer development.

    Properly managing yearling heifer reproduction is the first step toward reproductive efficiency.

    Your goal is to manage heifers so they’ll conceive early by reducing the age of puberty, shortening the time from puberty to conception and increasing fertility.

  • Only consumers can put an end to puppy mills

    By Jane Sinnett

    Guest Columnist

    I just read about legislation concerning puppy mills and how different states have approached this problem in different ways.

    The 2014 puppy mills report goal is to inform consumers about widespread problems with puppy mills before they make an uninformed purchase that could potentially support animal cruelty.

  • Statewide teacher survey kicked off at Saffell Street Elementary

    By Ben Carlson

    The eyes of Kentucky’s public school teachers were on Saffell Street Elementary School on Monday as a veritable who’s who among the state’s top educators paid a visit to kick of a statewide teacher survey.

    Called the TELL (Teaching, Empowering, Leading and Learning) Kentucky Survey, it’s designed to gather information from counselors, principals and other administrators who deal with teaching and learning conditions every day.