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Today's News

  • Students earn degrees

    The University of the Cumberlands conferred five advanced degrees in education to five local students last month.

    Tracy Hall received a Masters of Arts in Education (MAE) degree in Read Write Specialist P to 12. Leslie Hulsey received a MAE in Teacher as Leader.

    Rebecca Moreland, Heather Snodgrass and Logan Young all received MAE’s in School Guidance Counselor.

  • Hollander completes research project in London

    Alyssa Hollander of Lawrenceburg, a junior majoring in aerospace engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), recently completed an intense, hands-on research project in London, according to a news release.

    The project was titled A Plan to Better Serve the Pollards Hill Community College.

  • Cox selected for Governor’s Scholars Program

    Katherine Cox, a daughter of Roger T. and Kay Cox, has been selected to attend the 2015 Kentucky Governor’s Scholars Program, according to a news release.

    Cox will attend classes at Murray State University for five weeks this summer, and will be a senior at Anderson County High School.

  • Squash is yet another gift of summer

    Summer squash are staples in Kentucky gardens and at local farmers markets. Their versatility makes them easy to prepare for tasty summer meals and side dishes. Two of the more popular varieties include yellow squash and zucchini.

    Squash are fleshy vegetables protected by a hard rind. They belong to the plant family that includes melons and cucumbers. The skin and rind of summer squash are rich in the nutrient beta-carotene, but the fleshy portion of this vegetable is not. To gain the full nutritional benefits of this vegetable, the skins or rinds must be eaten.

  • Do you have your water bag up yet?

    Happy July.If there was ever a contest for most bountiful month, this one is it. Even better, today is the first of two full moons this month. Today is the Full Buck Moon, so named because this is the time of year that bucks grow new antlers. However, it is also known as the Full Thunder Moon, because of the frequency of thunderstorms during the month.

  • Retirement for some old friends at ACE

    I would like to congratulate Jerry Shaw and Ann Asbury on their retirement from the Anderson County Adult Learning Center. I have enjoyed working with them for many years and I consider them both dear friends.

    I worked with Ann the longest. After working in banking for 18 years, I changed jobs in 1998 and became a math tutor and worked as Ann’s instructional assistant under LaVerne Brumley. Over the years Ann has taught me a great deal about teaching, organizing, and always remembering to log student progress in their file.

  • Thousands pay final respects to trooper killed in car wreck

    By Ben Carlson and Ricki Barker, News staff

    A note found in trooper Eric Chrisman’s apartment shortly after his death asked a simple but poignant question: “What legacy do you want to leave?”

    That question was answered for him over the past week as thousands upon thousands of people honored his service to Kentucky, his faith in God and comforted his family following his tragic death.

  • City officer laid to rest

    In less than one week Lawrenceburg has laid to rest two of its finest men. One was a veteran, who spent years serving his community and was well versed in all aspects of law enforcement. Another was much younger, but no less honorable. What he lacked in experience he made up for in commitment to his duty and maturity beyond his years.

  • Schools opt out of non-traditional instruction program

    Snow days may have lost their appeal to some Kentucky students this upcoming school year. Instead of building snowmen and sledding when winter weather forces schools to close, students from 44 Kentucky school districts will be completing pre-arranged lessons from their teachers at home.

    Many school districts have opted to participate in a non-traditional instruction program designed to keep students learning even when bad weather keeps them out of the classroom.

    Anderson County is not one of them.

  • Chrisman will live on as The Trooper

    If you travel down Coffee Tree Road in Frankfort you will soon find yourself face-to-face with the new Kentucky State Police Academy, and while this impressive former prison is a sight to behold; if you take a quick walk of the grounds and steer your steps to the center of the compound, you will find The Trooper.

    He stands 10-feet-tall and his bronze uniform gleams in the sunlight. He rests upon a small platform that reads ‘For all that serve and those who gave all.’