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Today's News

  • Boyce is his choice
  • Running for the Tigers
  • Price war among barber shops brings on business

    80 YEARS AGO

    Thursday, March 25, 1937

    A price war among the barbershops in Lawrenceburg started yesterday afternoon, and little by little the price of shaves and haircuts went down until they reached 10 cents for a shave and 15 cents for a haircut.

    Looking into all the shops in town, it was found they were all well filled and doing a thriving business. One shop in particular was doing so well that it looked like it would pay them to keep the prices down.

  • Food samples, Easter recipes available during Business Expo

    This week is a very special week for me. Approximately one year ago, Ben Carlson came to my house and interviewed me about my new business and put me on the front page.

  • Harpists to perform March 28

    Anderson Community Education will present an “Evening of Harps,” with Jane Bennett and Sheila McFarland, local instrumentalists and members of the Heartland Harp Ensemble.

    The presentation is scheduled for 7 p.m. March 28 at the Anderson Senior Center, located at 160 Township Square, Lawrenceburg and will feature sacred, Celtic and popular tunes.

    Bennett is a native of Harrodsburg, but currently lives in Anderson County. She is a graduate of Transylvania University and received a master’s degree from Western Kentucky University in psychology.

  • Central Baptist sponsors annual Soles4Souls shoe drive

    Central Baptist Church in Lawrenceburg has started its annual Soles4Souls shoe drive to provide shoes to people in need around the world.

    “This is our seventh year,” said Pastor Rick Clark. “Two years ago we passed 10,000 from just this church. Last year we added 3,200 pairs. We are hoping that we can exceed 15,000 total [this year] since we started the collection. The event runs through March 28, and we have received 400 pairs already.”

  • Throwing some shade on safety report

    Column as I see ’em …

    While admittedly running the risk of sounding like President Trump poo-pooing intelligence reports from the nation’s spooks, I nevertheless have to throw some shade on the Transportation Cabinet’s safety study on Highway 151.

  • Let the gardening season begin

    It’s spring, so let’s indulge in all things green.

    We can begin with a green thumb. Those who believe they lack said thumb need only do two things. The first is put the plant in light, where you will see it a lot, every day. The second is to water it when the soil is no longer damp. Try it.

    There is a lot of green sprouting up in the yard. I have patches of deep green and spots of yellow green. The yellow green tells me the acid is high in the soil there, so it is a good spot for some acid-loving plants, or a healthy dose of agricultural lime.

  • Charter schools among legislation designed to improve education

    Each of us had a school teacher who we still remember today. That teacher may have spent extra time helping us hone a skill we needed a little more time to learn. Or maybe he or she was a listening ear when we couldn’t find one anywhere else.

  • Here are keys to manage frost damage in your alfalfa stands

    First, it is important to understand that determining the temperature that alfalfa stands were exposed to during a frost event is less than exact science.

    Air temperature reported by local news stations likely uses data logged at a weather station that was installed according to National Weather Service guidelines. These guidelines state that sensors should be installed on level terrain, away from paved or concrete surfaces and upright structures, 4 to 6 feet above the soil surface, and in a radiation shield.