Today's News

  • Way We Were: Harold and Maudie preferred milkin' by hand

    By Janie Bowen
    News staff
    I recently took a drive down to the Van Buren Boat Ramp at Taylorsville Lake and as I drove along Pleasant Grove Ridge, I was flooded with memories.
    Of course my grandparents, Robert and Emolyn Searcy, lived in the heart of Van Buren before Taylorsville Lake came about, so I have traveled that road many times.
    However, one of those memories had to do with a story for June Dairy Month.
    There aren’t enough dairy farms left in Anderson County to celebrate dairy month now, but 30 years ago was a different story.

  • News briefs: 6-20-12

    Experimental Aircraft Association offers free airplane rides
    The Experimental Aircraft Association will offer free airplane rides Saturday, June 23 at Capital City airport, located at 90 Airport Road in Frankfort, starting at 10 a.m.
    The rides will be open to children ages 8-17.
    There will also be a free pancake breakfast before the first plane ride at 10 a.m.
    For information on the event, contact 502-319-2438.

    Critic praises Four Roses

  • Scouts give Old Glory proper sendoff
  • District court docket: 6-20-12

    Judge Donna Dutton heard the following cases during Anderson District Court proceedings on May 21.
    Christopher Harlan, arraignment, license to be in possession – dismissed.
    Adela G. Gomez, continued first appearance, failure of non-owner operator to maintain required insurance, license to be in possession – dismissed; no operator/moped license – pleaded guilty, $393, installment/deferred payment July 30.
    Zackary E. Holt, show cause, license to be in possession – paid.

  • 2012 Fair and Horse Show features new pageant

    The Lawrenceburg Fair and Horse Show, in addition to a variety of horse shows, also offers another kind of competition — pageants.
    For the 140th Fair and Horse Show, one new pageant is being added to the schedule of events — the Mrs. Lawrenceburg pageant.
    “We’ve had interest over the last couple of years, hopefully, within the next couple of years, we’ll able to send our winner to the Mrs. State competition,” said pageant organizer Carolyn Cole.

  • Finding more than distilleries on the Bourbon Trail

    By Meaghan Downs
    News staff
    Travelers with a taste for the arts can find more than liquor on the Bourbon Trail.
    Ask two Lawrenceburg business owners — art connoisseur Brenda Gardner and potter Susan Burge — who opened two studios on Bonds Mill Road in the hopes of attracting tourists (and locals) to support Kentucky art.  
    Burge, a former painter turned potter who has been making pottery for about 15 years, had been selling her clay pottery out of her barn on Johnson Road and participating in art shows for years.

  • Radio hams converge here this weekend for national event

    Anderson County’s “hams” will join thousands of amateur radio operators by showing off their emergency operations June 23-24 in the county park, according to a news release.
    This annual field day event is the climax of the week-long amateur radio week sponsored by ARRL, the national association for amateur radio.
    Using only emergency power supplies, ham operators will contact emergency stations in parks, shopping malls, schools and backyards across the country.

  • Break out the hose and watch your garden grow

    Summer is official here and that means the real fun is about to begin.
    Cabbage, potatoes, and squash should be gracing dinner tables everywhere, and beans, corn, cucumbers and tomatoes aren’t far behind.
    While I love my winter casseroles, summer food is my favorite.

  • Rebates are out there, you just have to try

    In April I mailed in a rebate request for a garden hose I had purchased locally.
    I received a postcard stating that I had forgotten to send in the receipt and had a couple of weeks to return it with the postcard attached. I was lucky to find the receipt quickly. It cost two stamps and less than 10 minutes altogether to get the $10 rebate.  
    Did you know that many rebates go unclaimed?  Consumers don’t complete the forms either on-line or through the mail. Others throw away the box with the bar code on it.

  • Pre-integration memories linger for black Anderson County student

    My story is about where I went to high school. To visit this, we have to go back to 1951, my first year in high school.
    It was September 1951 when the black high school students who lived in the city limits of Lawrenceburg were put on a school bus and transported to Lincoln Institute High School, located in Lincoln Ridge, about two miles from Simpsonville.
    Lincoln opened its doors in 1912; we have just finished 100 years. All black people who got out of high school before 1962 finished at Lincoln Institute, and the Lock Road kids went to Simmons in Versailles.