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Today's News

  • City, county tag-team fire

    It’s rare for the city fire district to call in Anderson County fire district backup, but in the case of the June 9 kitchen fire in a residence on North Main Street, it was necessary.
    “When we’re shorthanded, especially with this extreme heat, we knew they would be pretty exhausted when they came out,” Robert Hume, city fire chief, said.

  • Summons issued for Hammond Road property owner

    A criminal summons has been issued to the owner of a dilapidated house at 1140 Hammond Road, County Attorney Bobbi Jo Lewis announced during last week’s meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court.
    The house’s owner, Steve Gay, has apparently ignored an order issued in April by Anderson County Fire Chief Mike Barnes to tear down the house, which was filled with trash and debris and posed a fire hazard.

  • Fiscal court names new parks, rec director

    The Anderson County Fiscal Court approved a new director for its parks and recreation department, but it wasn’t unanimous.
    Nick Satterly, 21, who has worked as the department’s interim director since the death earlier this year of former director Chip Bishop, was approved at a salary of $34,000 a year.
    Only Magistrate Kenny Barnett voted against hiring Satterly.
    “I do have doubts about this boy,” Barnett said during last Tuesday’s meeting of the fiscal court.

  • When the heat’s on, look for water

    Living in Arizona for 23 years gave me a lot of insight into heat. As a park ranger I saw a lot of its effects. Visitors would always, always say, “but it’s a dry heat.” My reply, “so is an oven.”
    High heat takes a toll on all living things.
    If you work outside in this heat, my advice is to drink lots of water and eat ketchup and/or bananas. The potassium helps. If you have plants in the ground, then mulch and water is the best reviver.

  • Capitalize on tourism to invest in future

    We need to capitalize on tourism
    “The tourists are coming, the tourists are coming!”
    With all due apologies to Paul Revere, William Dawes and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, let the rallying cry ring out; for indeed the tourist are coming.

  • Absorbing accents

    Accents cling to me.
    I don’t invite them in. It just happens, every time I move and anytime I constantly hear a specific regional dialect.
    Chameleons change color. Tigers stalk prey in striped fur to match their dark jungle habitat.
    Speech becomes my camouflage.
    As I adjust to living here, I’ve caught myself falling into a Southern dialect when I’m talking. Don’t get me wrong; I wouldn’t mind having a Kentucky accent.
    I’m just never consistent.

  • Want to knock me off my pedestal?

    Column as I see ’em …
    “Am I that detestable?” I asked a friend. “Do you really think people would pay money to throw baseballs at me and knock me into a tank of water?”
    “Yes,” he said. “Given the things you write, there are people who will empty their bank accounts to buy chances to throw balls at you, just on the odd chance that one will bust through the screen and hit you in your big mouth.”

  • Remembering Daddy on Father's Day

    It was a day like any other workday.
    I woke up around 6 and was messing around the house, getting ready . . . and the phone rings.
    “Something’s wrong with your daddy,” Mama said.
    After talking to her a few seconds, I found out he was hurting in his back. I could hear him over the phone, groaning. She had already called my younger brother, Bertram, who lives up the road from them.
    “I’ll call an ambulance,” I said and hung up.
    After calling 911, I called her back and Bertram was there.

  • Census numbers forces 6th District to get even bigger

    The county’s 6th Magisterial District will gobble up large chunks of the 2nd and 5th districts if the fiscal court approves a proposed reapportionment plan.
    Anderson County added roughly 2,000 residents during the past decade, forcing reapportionment because each of the county’s six districts must be within 10 percent in terms of population.
    Little of that population growth occurred in the 6th district, which has always consisted of the sparsely populated western portion of the county.

  • City zoning violations to be declared civil offenses

    The Lawrenceburg City Council on Monday approved the first reading of a new ordinance granting its code enforcement board the authority to hear and enforce contested zoning violations.
    The council also discussed amended cemetery rules, including what can and cannot be placed at gravesites in Lawrenceburg Cemetery.
    Zoning violations, including violations of the city’s sign ordinance, could be classified as civil offenses and enforced by the five-member enforcement board.