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Today's News

  • Historic district commission moves first public hearing to Dec. 6

    Due to a Gideon's event occuring at the Senior Citizens' Center, the historic district commission will move its first public hearing regarding the establishment of the proposed Lawrenceburg historic district to Dec. 6 at 6 p.m. at the Anderson County Senior Citizens’ Center.
    Historic district landowners and adjacent landowners will be given 15 days notice of the hearing, and all are invited.
    The proposed historic district area will include:

  • Signs removed from new civil offense ordinance

    If at first you don’t follow procedure, vote again.
    After failing to follow proper voting procedure in its Oct. 10 meeting, the city council voted to approve a new civil offense ordinance for the second time in a special-called meeting Monday afternoon, this time with a few changes.
    The council unanimously approved a different version of the civil offense ordinance than what passed Oct. 10, voting to exclude sign violations from being classified as civil offenses, and lowering the maximum fine penalties for contested violations to $20-200 from $25-250.

  • Lousy winter prediction means time to prepare

    I love nature. The beautiful sounds of the morning birds serenading me, joined by the magnificent sight of fall leaves bordering the bright green hay fields, makes me stop in my tracks every time. Then, I remember that winter is coming.

  • Send Halloween photos via Facebook to the News

    Facebook doesn’t have to be reserved to funny cat videos.
    It can also be an engaging way for us — the newsroom and the newspaper reader — to dialogue and share Anderson County through community photos.
    More than half of Facebook’s 800 million active users log into Facebook every day, according to Facebook statistics.
    And I’m guessing that our readers are some of those same people.
    Just a hunch.
    As community journalists, we’re always looking for ways to connect the newsstands to the realm of digital media.

  • Conway’s intervention likely doomed to fail

    Column as I see ’em …
    Prediction: Health Director Brandon Hurley isn’t going to be fired tonight (Wednesday).
    In fact, if Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway makes good on his promise to make a motion to have him fired, odds are better than 50-50 his motion won’t even get a second.
    Here’s why: A majority of the health board serves as Hurley’s enablers and, because they have allowed him to continue his destructive actions, they are now his codependents.

  • Harry Wise Road zoning debate settled, for now

    The zone change saga on Harry Wise Road was put to rest Monday morning during a special called meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court.
    By a 4-3 vote, magistrates upheld a recommendation from the planning and zoning commission to keep a 16-acre tract of property there zoned A1.
    The property owner, Larry Cann, has tried for the past year to have the zoning changed to A2, which would allow him to build 16 homes vs. the eight homes he could build on A1, which requires lot sizes of at least 2 acres.

  • Marching on, perhaps to state finals

    In the Anderson County marching band’s debut competition for the 2011 season, they took home the title of reserve grand champion.
    That’s not necessarily something band director Patrick Brady would have envisioned happening three years ago.
    When Brady came to Anderson County High School as a 23-year-old music instructor, he had with no previous experience as head director of a marching band, other than assisting as a paraprofessional for one year.
    “Got my feet wet pretty quick,” Brady said.

  • Another bad audit for county

    Last year’s audit of the Anderson County Fiscal Court’s finances wasn’t good, and neither is the one just released by the state auditor.
    From credit card purchases for items not explained on receipts to employees being paid without signatures on time cards, state Auditor Crit Luallen pointed out multiple problems with the fiscal court’s financial management, just as she did the previous year.

  • Pot grower’s nightmare

    Whoever had roughly $100,000 worth of pot growing near the old Southern States building on Highway 44 is going to be mighty disappointed the next time they stop by to water their plants.
    The Anderson County Sheriff’s Office and Kentucky State Police used machetes Monday morning to chop down 47 fully budded marijuana plants in a secluded area almost directly behind Rite Aid.
    No arrests were made, but an investigation is ongoing, according to a news release from Chief Deputy Joe Milam.

  • Franklin torches Anderson for district title

    Everything anyone wanted to know about Franklin County’s romp past Anderson County on Friday night could be found on the stat sheet.


    The story of Franklin’s 56-24 win for the Class 5A, District 6 championship was right there, shouting for all to take a look: Ryan Timmons, eight carries, 175 yards, three touchdowns. An average of 21.9 yards per carry.


    Not a bad night for the junior wide receiver who is considered one of the top talents in Kentucky.