.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Way We Were: Water was slowly rising in Taylorsville Lake

    50 YEARS AGO
    Jan. 10, 1963
    Judith Ann Peach, daughter of of Mr. and Mrs. Coleman Peach of Gee was to undergo open-heart surgery at the children’s hospital in Louisville.
    Anderson County Blood Program chairman Truman Birdwhistell said that the blood would be furnished by the hospital; however, an appeal would be made for 26 to 40 Anderson Countians to give blood at the Center in February to replace the blood used.

    The new 5-cent stamp became effective for first class mail.

  • Community calendar: 1-9-13

    Community
    Compassionate Friends announce upcoming meetings
    The Compassionate Friends will host meetings for bereavement parents who have lost children of any age.
    Meetings are held on the first Thursday from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and the third Monday from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the hospice building, 643 Teton Trail in Frankfort.For more information, contact Kathy Wainscott at 502-517-6289.
    Anderson Public Library offers computer, yoga classes

  • Zumba dance fitness classes offered

    Anderson Community Education will offer a Zumba dance fitness class every Tuesday and Thursday beginning Jan. 15 in the Saffell Street Elementary cafeteria.
    Tonjua Casey is the certified instructor for the class.
    Session I will be held from 4:15-5 p.m. Session II will be held 5:15-6 p.m.
    The cost of the class is $5 per class or $45 for 10 classes.

  • American Legion Auxiliary pledges to donate to CASA

    The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 34 has pledged to donate $100 per month for a year to the Court Appointed Special Advocates for Abused and Neglected Children or CASA. This money will be paid quarterly, according to a release from the Auxiliary.
    “We are challenging every organization, business, church and individual to make a commitment to save our children by donating much needed money or by volunteering,” the release states. “Each person can make a difference.

  • School system reviews security in response to tragic shooting

    Following the tragic December school shooting in Newtown, Conn., many school districts across the country are beginning 2013 by re-evaluating their schools’ safety procedures.
    Anderson County is no exception.
    School Resource Officer Joe Saunier checked the locked door of a Saffell Street Elementary classroom Tuesday morning during a lockdown, one of several drills being conducted at Anderson County schools that day.  

  • School district settles civil rights lawsuit

    The Anderson County School District has settled a civil rights lawsuit brought by an instructional assistant, according to federal court records.
    The terms have yet to be disclosed, but court records reveal that the district has agreed to a settlement with Kathy Campbell of 1077 Indian Trail Way, Lawrenceburg, who claimed her rights were violated when she lost her job at the end of the 2010-11 school year.

  • Sixth graders thank senior citizens for sharing stories, advice

    Editor’s note: Students in Mrs. Jennifer Johnson’s sixth grade literacy class at the Anderson County Middle School read a story titled “Notes from the Midnight Driver.” The book is about a teenage boy who breaks the law and, as punishment, is assigned community service at a nursing home. His assigned resident is a very grumpy man; however, as the book progresses the two characters discover they have several things in common and in the end become good friends.

  • Farmers Bank wins annual ‘Spirit of Giving’ food drive

    The Main Street and West Broadway branches of Farmers Bank were awarded the “Spirit of Giving” food drive mayor’s cup trophy after donating a collective 1,310 pounds of food to Open Hands food pantry.
    This year Lawrenceburg banks collected more than 2,700 pounds of food, 700 pounds more than last year, according to a news release from city hall.

  • Hoarding is more than sad TV show

    Compulsive hoarding is a health condition that has received much attention from the media in recent years. However, hoarding is not always easy to detect and may be more widespread than many believe.
    Compulsive hoarding can be secretive. An individual can discreetly accumulate items over many years. Sometimes hoarding is discovered only when the individual is no longer able to live in their own home or the family cleans the home following the loved one’s death.

  • Remedies to keep your vehicle free of ice

    Well we’ve made it to the season of “ahh.” The holidays are over and we start to settle back in to some kind of routine. Our days and nights are calmer. The decorations are back in their boxes and all the trash has finally been picked up. Now, we just have to get through winter.