Today's News

  • Fiscal court pelts Carey with questions over pulling events

    Controversy over use of the pulling track at the county park continued last week, including stiff questions from the county attorney over events being scheduled without the fiscal court’s approval.
    The topic surfaced during last Tuesday night’s meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court as magistrates considered a request to abandon its current lease system for the track in favor of simply renting it out.

  • Woman offers $1,000 reward for missing wedding ring

    She’s taken the seats out of her car and torn apart her 8-month-old granddaughter’s diaper bag.
    But Lisa Ann Winfrey of Lawrenceburg hasn’t given up on finding her priceless wedding band.
    Not yet, anyway.
    The missing ring is actually more like a bracelet, she said; she’s soldered together her wedding band, engagement ring, 10th anniversary wedding band and separate gold “enhancer” that wraps around the solitaire diamond into one piece.

  • Kentucky Farm Bureau now accepting local applications for 2013 ‘Farmer of the Year’

    The 2013 Kentucky Farm Bureau “Farmer of the Year” application process is now open, and the organization is seeking the commonwealth’s finest nominees for this prestigious award, according to a news release.
    Farm Bureau initiated a “Farmer of the Year” awards program as a way to recognize its members for their commitment to excellence in agriculture, efficiency in farming practices, sound financial management and outstanding leadership, according to the release.

  • Crepps serves as House Majority Leader page
  • Four Roses’ new limited edition features 13-year-old barrel strength bourbon

    This spring, Four Roses Distillery will issue the newest release in its series of limited-quantity special bottlings with the 2013 Limited Edition Single Barrel Bourbon, which will be bottled at barrel strength and feature spicy characteristics of cinnamon, nutmeg and brown sugar, according to a press release.
    Four Roses Master Distiller Jim Rutledge personally selected a 13-year-old bourbon that uses Four Roses’ recipe coded OBSK, one of 10 uniquely handcrafted bourbon recipes produced by the Lawrenceburg-based distillery.

  • High-speed chase starts here, ends in Mercer County

    A Russell Springs man was jailed after police say he lead them on a high-speed chase Monday morning that began in Lawrenceburg and ended 40 miles away in Mercer County.
    Dallas Corey Crawford, 38, was arrested and taken to Lawrenceburg Police Department where he was transported to Shelby County Detention Center.  His charges include first-degree fleeing and evading a police officer, three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment, reckless driving, careless driving, no seat belt and other violations, according to a news release from the Kentucky State Police.

  • Patience is a virtue, even for gardeners

    Patience. I’m pretty sure that’s what we all need right now.
    It is the middle of April and while a decade into our future we may be planting at this date, climate change has not taken us there yet.
    Our typical planting date here is right around Derby day. That does not mean that you can just sit around and wait.

  • I’ve found the enemy, it’s us

    Bending paperclips calms me.
    Fragile metal contorted into shepherd’s hooks or misshapen cranes lay inert beneath computer paper shrouds.
    Their broken limbs of snapped, twisted metal litter my desk.
    They are the leftovers of trying to wield control in an uncontrollable world.
    Destroying something that can’t ever be made whole again relieves stress.  
    It always has.
    When I was a child, usually sitting in the left outfield wearing my baseball mitt as a hat, my fingers happily found grass to destroy.  

  • Lawsuit blessing in disguise for library

    The Anderson Public library’s board of trustees will apparently wait until a court orders it to comply with the statute that governs how it’s supposed to set tax rates before doing so on its own.
    And that’s a shame because by doing so the board is missing out on a great chance to reinvent its image and survive what will otherwise be a devastating financial blow.
    The order to lower its tax rate has already come for a library in northern Kentucky and, trust me on this, a similar order will eventually be issued here.

  • Bibb lettuce has strong Kentucky roots

    Kentuckians may know that Bibb lettuce was developed by Major John Bibb in the backyard of his Frankfort home — Grey Gables (Bibb-Burnley House).
    He moved to Frankfort in 1856 and shared his seeds and plants with friends. Soon it became known as Bibb lettuce and became commercially produced in 1935.
    Soon you will be able to buy Bibb lettuce at the local farmer’s markets. The Anderson County Farmer’s Market opens Friday, April 26 at noon.