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Today's News

  • Ex-state senator charged with DUI following wreck

    A former Kentucky state senator was charged with DUI following a non-injury wreck earlier this month on the Bluegrass Parkway in Anderson County.
    Joey Pendleton, 67, of 905 Hurst Drive, Hopkinsville was more than three times over the legal limit for alcohol when he was arrested, according to a citation filed by deputy Brian Boggs of the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office.

  • Bill removes King as representative in Anderson

    Anderson County will lose state Rep. Kim King as its state representative and receive a new one from Monroe County as a result of district boundary changes included in the state’s new redistricting legislation.
    Gov. Steve Beshear signed a redistricting bill last Friday that will, if given final approval by a federal three-judge panel, split 24 counties into multiple districts and create four new House districts.

  • Mystery of the missing grapes

    I am a natural born morning person. I like to watch the sun come up and brighten my day. Every day the grass and weeds get taller. The mower blades are almost shot and the weed trimmer is whining for the repair shop. We’ve had a lot of growth this summer and we have 25 more days of it.
    As the season winds down, I kick in to winter mode. I like to stock the shelves with all things necessary to get through the winter by the end of September. Because the more I get carried in now, the less I have to carry up the hill when the drive in covered in snow and ice.

  • From the education desk: Bibles, ACT and attendance

    I look pretty good in hats.
    And I wear a few of them: features writer, page designer, city government beat reporter and amateur expert in how to cover the Fair and Horse Show pageants.
    In this week’s column, I’ll put on the hat I reserve for education news (not sure what kind of literal hat that would be, but you can use your imagination) in a quick round-up of some interesting education news from the last few weeks.

    God isn’t dead even if we may not be able to pass out Bibles in school

  • Nothing ‘decent’ about Herndon’s column

    I became enraged as I read [sports editor] John Herndon’s column entitled “What happened to decency?” concerning the recent bill passed in California that protects transgender students’ right to choose the gendered sport and locker room that matches their gender identity.

  • Bubble break
  • Sign ordinance has major, minor flaws

    Column as I see ’em …
    It’s a shame that after years of effort and no small amount of compromise the new sign ordinance being proposed by the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce does absolutely nothing to fix the current ordinance’s fatal flaw.
    Not that the chamber could do a thing about that flaw, which is simply that two zoning boards of adjustments — one city, one county — can override the ordinance at will by granting waivers.

  • ‘Mistake’ allows home invasion suspect to walk

    An 18-year-old Lawrenceburg teen suspected of holding two teens at gunpoint in a home invasion has been released from jail with all charges dismissed following a complaint about his case’s improper transfer from juvenile to Circuit Court.
    During an Anderson County Circuit Court hearing last Tuesday, Circuit Court Judge Charles Hickman dismissed charges against Kendall Cunningham, 18, and ruled that Cunningham be consequently released from Shelby County Detention Center.

  • School board to set tax rate on Sept. 4

    A hearing regarding the upcoming fiscal year’s school board tax rate is tentatively scheduled to be held Wednesday, Sept. 4 at 6:45 p.m., according to an e-mail from Superintendent Sheila Mitchell.
    A special-called board meeting will be held following the meeting in order to vote on the rate, which would increase 4 percent based on a budget OK’d earlier this year.

  • ACLU warns school district about Gideon’s Bibles

    The American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky or ACLU has warned the state’s school superintendents to follow federal law in allowing groups to distribute non-educational material, including religious literature, during school hours or face future litigation.