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Today's News

  • District court docket: 4-24-13

    Judge Donna Dutton heard the following cases during Anderson District Court proceedings on Feb. 28, 2013.
    Christopher J. Caffee, arraignment, second-degree disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, menacing – pleaded not guilty, pretrial conference March 28.
    Samantha L. Allison, bond forfeiture hearing, theft by deception (less than $500) – bond forfeited, bench warrant.
    Jonathon W. Anderson, motion to revoke probation, two counts of theft by deception (less than $500) – defendant to report to Kentucky Alternative Programs.

  • Driver flips pick-up truck to avoid hitting dog
  • School board approves salary step increase for teachers

    The school board unanimously approved a salary step increase for Anderson County school district teachers during its April meeting on Monday night.
    Teachers received a salary step increase — a raise in pay based on years of teaching and experience — and a 1 percent raise for 2012-2013.
    A raise in pay will not be possible for next fiscal year’s budget, Finance Officer Nick Clark said Monday night, recommending the board approve the current certified and classified salary schedule minus any raise.

  • Education briefs: 4-24-13

    Lawrenceburg student receives $1,000 scholarship
    from Kentucky law enforcement memorial foundation
    Harrison Mark-Shane Evans of Lawrenceburg was recently awarded the Gerald F. Healy Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation Scholarship, according to a press release.
    Evans, a student at the University of Kentucky, was one of 25 recipients of the $1,000 scholarship. Evans is the son of Lexington Division of Police Detective Lora Harrison.

  • Library board delays decision on next fiscal year’s budget

    Library board trustees tabled its 2013-2014 fiscal year budget to weigh decisions about capital outlay and future library expansion funds, as well as possible salary raises for library staff.
    Board members unanimously voted to table a final budget until its next board meeting on May 21, some trustees citing an “overwhelming” amount of information presented to them during last Tuesday’s meeting.
    Earlier in the meeting, several Anderson County residents indicated a potential lawsuit would be filed against the library regarding its tax rate.

  • Raman freed after 30 years of paying his family debt

    Although many people consider slavery to be an event of the past, slavery still exist in many countries, as well as the United States. Modern day slavery can effect by debt bondage and forced labor. Many researchers told and showed that 27 million people work as slaves in the world. This number is higher than the number of slaves that were in slavery in the past. There are several examples from text and videos that show the world this horrible problem.

  • More people enslaved today than ever before

    Most people think that slavery only happened long ago, but actually there are more people enslaved today then there ever have been. Even though it’s illegal everywhere, there is an estimate of 27,000,000 slaves worldwide. Slavery types are debt bondage and forced labor. Even when slavery was legal in the U.S., there weren’t as many slaves as there are today. An example from a text shows that slavery is still around.

  • Learn about Rajesh, help stop slavery

    Although most people consider slavery non-existent, slavery does exist in many different countries, including the U.S. Research on slavery shows that an estimate of 27 million people are enslaved. That number is more than the number of slaves that were enslaved when slavery was legal back in the 1800s.  Several examples from videos, texts, and even a survey shows the world what slavery is like.

  • Even America has modern-day slavery

    Although many people think that slavery is a thing of the past, slavery is still with us today in many countries. Even the USA has things going on. Slavery is happening by debt bondage and forced labor. Research shows that an estimate of 27 million people are still enslaved workers in the world. The number of slaves today are higher than any other part of our history.

  • You can help stand against slavery

    Although many people consider slavery to be an event of the past, slavery still does exist in many countries as well as the United States. Research shows that an estimated 27 million people are enslaved workers in the world today. Several examples from texts, videos and a survey show the world a picture of modern slavery.