.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Sheriff’s office to conduct checkpoints

    The Anderson County Sheriff’s Office will be conducting periodic traffic safety checkpoints at approved locations.
    These checkpoints will be conducted in an effort to enforce the traffic laws of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Special attention will be paid to occupant protection (seatbelt adherence), sobriety, insurance and registration violations.

  • Judge-Executive proposes buying pothole-patching machine

    Patching paved roads and fixing potholes is expensive and doesn’t work very well.
    That was the message Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway delivered to the Anderson County Fiscal Court last Tuesday night, along with a means of fixing the problem.
    Conway, who had about two decades of roadwork experience before taking office, recommended that the county consider purchasing a $69,000 machine to patch and pave roads that he says will save taxpayers money in the long run.

  • Spring brings tax deadline, absentee voting

    Spring is upon us. April is normally associated with rain, flowers or pollen, but at the county clerk’s office it is about boat license, delinquent taxes and absentee voting.
    Let’s begin with boats. All boat taxes and renewal decals are due in April.
    All delinquent taxes are transferred from the sheriff’s office to the county clerk’s office on April 16 at the close of business. If you haven’t paid your property taxes, do so before that date.

  • Early summer bonus for bugs and tissue makers

    Has anyone else’s nose been running like a faucet? There has to be plenty of something in the air that’s not normally this powerful.
    I don’t suffer from most allergies, but I have heard about the Ohio Valley crud. Maybe after 16 years here in Anderson County it finally caught me.
    Whatever it is, the makers of Kleenex must be very happy.

  • Living wheat free poses dietary challenges

    Almost 40 years ago I became aware that some people who have to live wheat free.
    What’s good for most of us can be harmful for a few. Proper diagnosis should be done by a qualified medical provider as gluten intolerance or celiac disease is often confused with wheat allergy. This column isn’t about medical advice. My goal is to increase awareness of the challenges of living wheat free and offer some guidelines.

  • No good answers for laziness

    Let’s face it. We’re lazy.
    Not just Anderson County, but the entire nation.
    Millions of dollars have been spent to study how easily and efficiently we become lazy.
    Who knows how much has been charged to credit card accounts so we can get the physique and fearless reputation of Chuck Norris.  
    The University of Wisconsin’s Population Institute recently released its 2012 study on the County Health Rankings, including Anderson County.

  • Modern version of ‘let me see your pay-pahs’

    It’s like your teenage daughter coming home and announcing she’s just a little bit pregnant.
    Of course there’s no such thing, nor is there a “minor” violation of the Constitution.
    Pretty heady declaration, I know, particularly when former Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist declared police roadblocks “minor” violations of the Fourth Amendment — you know, the pesky one that deals with unlawful search and seizure — but allowed them to continue out of concern for public safety.

  • Sheriff’s office says goodbye to one of its own
  • City sewer service for Bob-O-Link?

    John Collins of 1056 Hazel Drive spoke before the city council at its April 9 meeting to request that the city make sewer lines available for residents in the Bob-O-Link and Westwood subdivisions currently limited to septic systems.
    “I’ll be brief, because I need your help,” Collins said with a laugh.
    Residents of the subdivision formed a four-person committee, he said, and have been knocking on doors in the Bob-O-Link and Westwood subdivisions to get homeowners’ opinions on getting hooked up to sewer lines.

  • Logged in

    He admits he knew virtually nothing at the time about owning and operating a sawmill.
    So Lawrenceburg’s Gary McInturf did the logical thing: he bought one.
    The year was 2009. A storm blew over some oak trees in his yard on Ballard Road, but instead of sawing and removing the trees, McInturf’s wife suggested getting the logs turned into lumber.
    “My wife said, ‘Let’s get some furniture made from the oak trees,’” McInturf said. “So I took them to a guy in Shelbyville who had a sawmill.